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Attenuation of Oxidative Stress and Inflammatory Response by Chronic Cannabidiol Administration Is Associated with Improved n-6/n-3 PUFA Ratio in the White and Red Skeletal Muscle in a Rat Model of High-Fat Diet-Induced Obesity

Department of Physiology, Medical University of Bialystok, Mickiewicz Str. 2C, 15-222 Bialystok, Poland
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Academic Editor: R. Andrew Shanely
Nutrients 2021, 13(5), 1603; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13051603
Received: 25 March 2021 / Revised: 27 April 2021 / Accepted: 7 May 2021 / Published: 11 May 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Phytochemicals and Human Health)
The consumption of fatty acids has increased drastically, exceeding the nutritional requirements of an individual and leading to numerous metabolic disorders. Recent data indicate a growing interest in using cannabidiol (CBD) as an agent with beneficial effects in the treatment of obesity. Therefore, our aim was to investigate the influence of chronic CBD administration on the n-6/n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) ratio in different lipid fractions, inflammatory pathway and oxidative stress parameters in the white and red gastrocnemius muscle. All the designed experiments were performed on Wistar rats fed a high-fat diet (HFD) or a standard rodent diet for seven weeks and subsequently injected with CBD (10 mg/kg once daily for two weeks) or its vehicle. Lipid content and oxidative stress parameters were assessed using gas–liquid chromatography (GLC), colorimetric and/or immunoenzymatic methods, respectively. The total expression of proteins of an inflammatory pathway was measured by Western blotting. Our results revealed that fatty acids (FAs) oversupply is associated with an increasing oxidative stress and inflammatory response, which results in an excessive accumulation of FAs, especially of n-6 PUFAs, in skeletal muscles. We showed that CBD significantly improved the n-6/n-3 PUFA ratio and shifted the equilibrium towards anti-inflammatory n-3 PUFAs, particularly in the red gastrocnemius muscle. Additionally, CBD prevented generation of lipid peroxidation products and attenuated inflammatory response in both types of skeletal muscle. In summary, the results mentioned above indicate that CBD presents potential therapeutic properties with respect to the treatment of obesity and related disturbances. View Full-Text
Keywords: cannabidiol; cannabis; inflammation; insulin resistance; lipids; oxidative stress cannabidiol; cannabis; inflammation; insulin resistance; lipids; oxidative stress
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MDPI and ACS Style

Bielawiec, P.; Harasim-Symbor, E.; Sztolsztener, K.; Konstantynowicz-Nowicka, K.; Chabowski, A. Attenuation of Oxidative Stress and Inflammatory Response by Chronic Cannabidiol Administration Is Associated with Improved n-6/n-3 PUFA Ratio in the White and Red Skeletal Muscle in a Rat Model of High-Fat Diet-Induced Obesity. Nutrients 2021, 13, 1603. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13051603

AMA Style

Bielawiec P, Harasim-Symbor E, Sztolsztener K, Konstantynowicz-Nowicka K, Chabowski A. Attenuation of Oxidative Stress and Inflammatory Response by Chronic Cannabidiol Administration Is Associated with Improved n-6/n-3 PUFA Ratio in the White and Red Skeletal Muscle in a Rat Model of High-Fat Diet-Induced Obesity. Nutrients. 2021; 13(5):1603. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13051603

Chicago/Turabian Style

Bielawiec, Patrycja, Ewa Harasim-Symbor, Klaudia Sztolsztener, Karolina Konstantynowicz-Nowicka, and Adrian Chabowski. 2021. "Attenuation of Oxidative Stress and Inflammatory Response by Chronic Cannabidiol Administration Is Associated with Improved n-6/n-3 PUFA Ratio in the White and Red Skeletal Muscle in a Rat Model of High-Fat Diet-Induced Obesity" Nutrients 13, no. 5: 1603. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13051603

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