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Article

Dietary Patterns Derived from UK Supermarket Transaction Data with Nutrient and Socioeconomic Profiles

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Leeds Institute for Data Analytics and School of Geography, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK
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Sainsbury’s Supermarkets Ltd., Holborn, London EC1N 2HT, UK
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Leeds Institute for Data Analytics and School of Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Marika Massaro
Nutrients 2021, 13(5), 1481; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13051481
Received: 23 March 2021 / Revised: 16 April 2021 / Accepted: 20 April 2021 / Published: 27 April 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Nutritional Epidemiology)
Poor diet is a leading cause of death in the United Kingdom (UK) and around the world. Methods to collect quality dietary information at scale for population research are time consuming, expensive and biased. Novel data sources offer potential to overcome these challenges and better understand population dietary patterns. In this research we will use 12 months of supermarket sales transaction data, from 2016, for primary shoppers residing in the Yorkshire and Humber region of the UK (n = 299,260), to identify dietary patterns and profile these according to their nutrient composition and the sociodemographic characteristics of the consumer purchasing with these patterns. Results identified seven dietary purchase patterns that we named: Fruity; Meat alternatives; Carnivores; Hydrators; Afternoon tea; Beer and wine lovers; and Sweet tooth. On average the daily energy intake of loyalty card holders -who may buy as an individual or for a household- is less than the adult reference intake, but this varies according to dietary purchase pattern. In general loyalty card holders meet the recommended salt intake, do not purchase enough carbohydrates, and purchase too much fat and protein, but not enough fibre. The dietary purchase pattern containing the highest amount of fibre (as an indicator of healthiness) is bought by the least deprived customers and the pattern with lowest fibre by the most deprived. In conclusion, supermarket sales data offer significant potential for understanding population dietary patterns. View Full-Text
Keywords: dietary patterns; transaction data; nutrients; socioeconomic; big data; nutrition analytics; dietary assessment dietary patterns; transaction data; nutrients; socioeconomic; big data; nutrition analytics; dietary assessment
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MDPI and ACS Style

Clark, S.D.; Shute, B.; Jenneson, V.; Rains, T.; Birkin, M.; Morris, M.A. Dietary Patterns Derived from UK Supermarket Transaction Data with Nutrient and Socioeconomic Profiles. Nutrients 2021, 13, 1481. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13051481

AMA Style

Clark SD, Shute B, Jenneson V, Rains T, Birkin M, Morris MA. Dietary Patterns Derived from UK Supermarket Transaction Data with Nutrient and Socioeconomic Profiles. Nutrients. 2021; 13(5):1481. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13051481

Chicago/Turabian Style

Clark, Stephen D., Becky Shute, Victoria Jenneson, Tim Rains, Mark Birkin, and Michelle A. Morris. 2021. "Dietary Patterns Derived from UK Supermarket Transaction Data with Nutrient and Socioeconomic Profiles" Nutrients 13, no. 5: 1481. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13051481

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