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The Role of the Gut Microbiome, Immunity, and Neuroinflammation in the Pathophysiology of Eating Disorders

1
Institute for Behavioral Medicine Research, Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
2
Department of Psychology and Program in Neuroscience, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Co-first authors.
Academic Editors: Michael Conlon and Luba Sominsky
Nutrients 2021, 13(2), 500; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13020500
Received: 5 December 2020 / Revised: 19 January 2021 / Accepted: 29 January 2021 / Published: 3 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition and CNS: In Health and Disease)
There is a growing recognition that both the gut microbiome and the immune system are involved in a number of psychiatric illnesses, including eating disorders. This should come as no surprise, given the important roles of diet composition, eating patterns, and daily caloric intake in modulating both biological systems. Here, we review the evidence that alterations in the gut microbiome and immune system may serve not only to maintain and exacerbate dysregulated eating behavior, characterized by caloric restriction in anorexia nervosa and binge eating in bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder, but may also serve as biomarkers of increased risk for developing an eating disorder. We focus on studies examining gut dysbiosis, peripheral inflammation, and neuroinflammation in each of these eating disorders, and explore the available data from preclinical rodent models of anorexia and binge-like eating that may be useful in providing a better understanding of the biological mechanisms underlying eating disorders. Such knowledge is critical to developing novel, highly effective treatments for these often intractable and unremitting eating disorders. View Full-Text
Keywords: anorexia nervosa; bulimia nervosa; binge eating; cytokines; gut dysbiosis anorexia nervosa; bulimia nervosa; binge eating; cytokines; gut dysbiosis
MDPI and ACS Style

Butler, M.J.; Perrini, A.A.; Eckel, L.A. The Role of the Gut Microbiome, Immunity, and Neuroinflammation in the Pathophysiology of Eating Disorders. Nutrients 2021, 13, 500. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13020500

AMA Style

Butler MJ, Perrini AA, Eckel LA. The Role of the Gut Microbiome, Immunity, and Neuroinflammation in the Pathophysiology of Eating Disorders. Nutrients. 2021; 13(2):500. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13020500

Chicago/Turabian Style

Butler, Michael J.; Perrini, Alexis A.; Eckel, Lisa A. 2021. "The Role of the Gut Microbiome, Immunity, and Neuroinflammation in the Pathophysiology of Eating Disorders" Nutrients 13, no. 2: 500. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13020500

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Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

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