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Review

Three in One: The Potential of Brassica By-Products against Economic Waste, Environmental Hazard, and Metabolic Disruption in Obesity

1
CNC—Center for Neuroscience and Cell Biology, CIBB—Centre for Innovative Biomedicine and Biotechnology, University of Coimbra, 3004-504 Coimbra, Portugal
2
Department of Life Sciences, Faculty of Sciences and Technology, University of Coimbra, 3000-456 Coimbra, Portugal
3
Centre for the Research and Technology of Agro-Environmental and Biological Sciences, University of Trás-os-Montes and Alto Douro, 5000-801 Vila Real, Portugal
4
Inov4Agro—Institute for Innovation, Capacity Building and Sustainability of Agri-Food Production, University of Trás-os-Montes and Alto Douro, 5000-801 Vila Real, Portugal
5
Faculty of Sport Science and Physical Education, University of Coimbra, 3040-248 Coimbra, Portugal
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Maria Luz Fernandez
Nutrients 2021, 13(12), 4194; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13124194
Received: 13 October 2021 / Revised: 13 November 2021 / Accepted: 18 November 2021 / Published: 23 November 2021
A large amount of waste is generated within the different steps of the food supply chain, representing a significant loss of natural resources, plant material, and economic value for producers and consumers. During harvesting and processing, many parts of edible plants are not sold for consumption and end up as massive waste, adding environmental hazards to the list of concerns regarding food wastage. Examples are Brassica oleracea var. Italica (broccoli) by-products, which represent 75% of the plant mass. A growing concern in the Western world is obesity, which results from incorrect lifestyles and comprises an extensive array of co-morbidities. Several studies have linked these co-morbidities to increased oxidative stress; thus, naturally occurring and readily available antioxidant compounds are an attractive way to mitigate metabolic diseases. The idea of by-products selected for their biomedical value is not novel. However, there is innovation underlying the use of Brassica by-products in the context of obesity. For this reason, Brassica by-products are prime candidates to be used in the treatment of obesity due to its bioactive compounds, such as sulforaphane, which possess antioxidant activity. Here, we review the economic and health potential of Brassica bioactive compounds in the context of obesity. View Full-Text
Keywords: Brassica by-products; obesity; sulforaphane; oxidative stress Brassica by-products; obesity; sulforaphane; oxidative stress
MDPI and ACS Style

Castelão-Baptista, J.P.; Barros, A.; Martins, T.; Rosa, E.; Sardão, V.A. Three in One: The Potential of Brassica By-Products against Economic Waste, Environmental Hazard, and Metabolic Disruption in Obesity. Nutrients 2021, 13, 4194. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13124194

AMA Style

Castelão-Baptista JP, Barros A, Martins T, Rosa E, Sardão VA. Three in One: The Potential of Brassica By-Products against Economic Waste, Environmental Hazard, and Metabolic Disruption in Obesity. Nutrients. 2021; 13(12):4194. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13124194

Chicago/Turabian Style

Castelão-Baptista, José P., Ana Barros, Tânia Martins, Eduardo Rosa, and Vilma A. Sardão. 2021. "Three in One: The Potential of Brassica By-Products against Economic Waste, Environmental Hazard, and Metabolic Disruption in Obesity" Nutrients 13, no. 12: 4194. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13124194

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