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Article

Monitored Supplementation of Vitamin D in Preterm Infants: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Department of Neonatology and Neonatal Intensive Care, Medical University of Warsaw, 00-315 Warsaw, Poland
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Miguel Saenz de Pipaon and Walter A. Mihatsch
Nutrients 2021, 13(10), 3442; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13103442
Received: 24 August 2021 / Revised: 22 September 2021 / Accepted: 26 September 2021 / Published: 28 September 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Intravenous Feeding in Infants and Children)
Appropriate supplementation of vitamin D can affect infections, allergy, and mental and behavioral development. This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of monitored vitamin D supplementation in a population of preterm infants. 109 preterm infants (24 0/7–32 6/7 weeks of gestation) were randomized to receive 500 IU vitamin D standard therapy (n = 55; approximately 800–1000 IU from combined sources) or monitored therapy (n = 54; with an option of dose modification). 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentrations were measured at birth, 4 weeks of age, and 35, 40, and 52 ± 2 weeks of post-conceptional age (PCA). Vitamin D supplementation was discontinued in 23% of infants subjected to standard treatment due to increased potentially toxic 25(OH)D concentrations (>90 ng/mL) at 40 weeks of PCA. A significantly higher infants’ percentage in the monitored group had safe vitamin D levels (20–80 ng/mL) at 52 weeks of PCA (p = 0.017). We observed increased vitamin D levels and abnormal ultrasound findings in five infants. Biochemical markers of vitamin D toxicity were observed in two patients at 52 weeks of PCA in the control group. Inadequate and excessive amounts of vitamin D can lead to serious health problems. Supplementation with 800–1000 IU of vitamin D prevents deficiency and should be monitored to avoid overdose. View Full-Text
Keywords: vitamin D; osteopenia; prematurity; metabolic bone disease; rickets vitamin D; osteopenia; prematurity; metabolic bone disease; rickets
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kołodziejczyk-Nowotarska, A.; Bokiniec, R.; Seliga-Siwecka, J. Monitored Supplementation of Vitamin D in Preterm Infants: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Nutrients 2021, 13, 3442. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13103442

AMA Style

Kołodziejczyk-Nowotarska A, Bokiniec R, Seliga-Siwecka J. Monitored Supplementation of Vitamin D in Preterm Infants: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Nutrients. 2021; 13(10):3442. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13103442

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kołodziejczyk-Nowotarska, Alicja, Renata Bokiniec, and Joanna Seliga-Siwecka. 2021. "Monitored Supplementation of Vitamin D in Preterm Infants: A Randomized Controlled Trial" Nutrients 13, no. 10: 3442. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13103442

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