Next Article in Journal
Are Adherence to the Mediterranean Diet, Emotional Eating, Alcohol Intake, and Anxiety Related in University Students in Spain?
Next Article in Special Issue
Effects of Whey and Pea Protein Supplementation on Post-Eccentric Exercise Muscle Damage: A Randomized Trial
Previous Article in Journal
High Serum Folate Concentration Is Associated with Better Lung Function in Male Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Patients Who Are Current Smokers: Analysis of Nationwide Population-Based Survey
Previous Article in Special Issue
Effects of 120 vs. 60 and 90 g/h Carbohydrate Intake during a Trail Marathon on Neuromuscular Function and High Intensity Run Capacity Recovery
Article

Ingestion of Carbohydrate Prior to and during Maximal, Sprint Interval Cycling Has No Ergogenic Effect: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo Controlled, Crossover Study

Sport & Exercise Sciences Research Institute, School of Sport, Ulster University, Newtownabbey, Belfast BT37 0QB, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(8), 2223; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12082223
Received: 12 June 2020 / Revised: 23 July 2020 / Accepted: 23 July 2020 / Published: 25 July 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition and Muscle Recovery)
Carbohydrate (CHO) ingestion may improve intermittent sprint performance in repeated sprint efforts ≤15 s. Yet, evidence for its efficacy on sprint interval durations ~30 s is lacking. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of CHO ingestion on maximal sprint interval exercise. Fifteen (n = 15) recreational athletes (13/2 males/females, age 22 ± 2 years; height 176 ± 11 cm; mass 76.8 ± 11.3 kg) volunteered for this randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover design. Participants completed two experimental trials (performed 10-days apart) involving the ingestion of an 8% CHO solution or a flavour and appearance-matched placebo (PLA) solution (5 mL/kg/bw), immediately before exercise, and preceding the second interval of four × 30 s bouts of repeated maximal sprint efforts (separated by 3.5 min of passive recovery). Peak and mean power (W) output progressively decreased during the repeated sprints (main effect of time, p < 0.0001), but there were no differences between CHO and PLA during any of the sprints (p > 0.05 for condition main effect and condition × time interaction). Physiological responses (blood lactate, heart rate, oxygen consumption, respiratory exchange ratio and RPE) were also unaltered by CHO ingestion. In conclusion, CHO ingestion does not enhance performance or modulate physiological responses during intermittent maximal, sprint cycling. View Full-Text
Keywords: anaerobic; ergogenic aid; solution; substrate utilisation anaerobic; ergogenic aid; solution; substrate utilisation
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

McMahon, G.; Thornbury, A. Ingestion of Carbohydrate Prior to and during Maximal, Sprint Interval Cycling Has No Ergogenic Effect: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo Controlled, Crossover Study. Nutrients 2020, 12, 2223. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12082223

AMA Style

McMahon G, Thornbury A. Ingestion of Carbohydrate Prior to and during Maximal, Sprint Interval Cycling Has No Ergogenic Effect: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo Controlled, Crossover Study. Nutrients. 2020; 12(8):2223. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12082223

Chicago/Turabian Style

McMahon, Gerard, and Aaron Thornbury. 2020. "Ingestion of Carbohydrate Prior to and during Maximal, Sprint Interval Cycling Has No Ergogenic Effect: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo Controlled, Crossover Study" Nutrients 12, no. 8: 2223. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12082223

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop