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Open AccessArticle

Effects of 120 vs. 60 and 90 g/h Carbohydrate Intake during a Trail Marathon on Neuromuscular Function and High Intensity Run Capacity Recovery

1
Centro Investigación y Formación ElikaSport, Cerdanyola del Valles, 08290 Barcelona, Spain
2
Institute of Biomedicine (IBIOMED), Physiotherapy Department, University of Leon, Campus de Vegazana, 24071 Leon, Spain
3
Glut4Science, Physiology, Nutrition and Sport, 01004 Vitoria-Gasteiz, Spain
4
Health, Physical Activity and Sports Science Laboratory, Department of Physical Activity and Sports, Faculty of Psychology and Education, University of Deusto, 48007 Bizkaia, Spain
5
Institute of Biomedicine (IBIOMED), Physiotherapy Department, University of Leon, Researcher at the Basque Country University, Campus de Vegazana, 24071 Leon, Spain
6
Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Physiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Valladolid, 42004 Soria, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(7), 2094; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12072094
Received: 3 June 2020 / Revised: 27 June 2020 / Accepted: 11 July 2020 / Published: 15 July 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition and Muscle Recovery)
Background: Current carbohydrate (CHO) intake recommendations for ultra-trail activities lasting more than 2.5 h is 90 g/h. However, the benefits of ingesting 120 g/h during a mountain marathon in terms of post-exercise muscle damage have been recently demonstrated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyze and compare the effects of 120 g/h CHO intake with the recommendations (90 g/h) and the usual intake for ultra-endurance athletes (60 g/h) during a mountain marathon on internal exercise load, and post-exercise neuromuscular function and recovery of high intensity run capacity. Methods: Twenty-six elite trail-runners were randomly distributed into three groups: LOW (60 g/h), MED (90 g/h) and HIGH (120 g/h), according to CHO intake during a 4000-m cumulative slope mountain marathon. Runners were measured using the Abalakov Jump test, a maximum a half-squat test and an aerobic power-capacity test at baseline (T1) and 24 h after completing the race (T2). Results: Changes in Abalakov jump time (ABKJT), Abalakov jump height (ABKH), half-squat test 1 repetition maximum (HST1RM) between T1 and T2 showed significant differences by Wilcoxon signed rank test only in LOW and MED (p < 0.05), but not in the HIGH group (p > 0.05). Internal load was significantly lower in the HIGH group (p = 0.017) regarding LOW and MED by Mann Whitney u test. A significantly lower change during the study in ABKJT (p = 0.038), ABKH (p = 0.038) HST1RM (p = 0.041) and in terms of fatigue (p = 0.018) and lactate (p = 0.012) within the aerobic power-capacity test was presented in HIGH relative to LOW and MED. Conclusions: 120 g/h CHO intake during a mountain marathon might limit neuromuscular fatigue and improve recovery of high intensity run capacity 24 h after a physiologically challenging event when compared to 90 g/h and 60 g/h. View Full-Text
Keywords: resistance; carbohydrates; fatigue; recovery; gut training; performance; gastrointestinal discomfort; absorption resistance; carbohydrates; fatigue; recovery; gut training; performance; gastrointestinal discomfort; absorption
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MDPI and ACS Style

Urdampilleta, A.; Arribalzaga, S.; Viribay, A.; Castañeda-Babarro, A.; Seco-Calvo, J.; Mielgo-Ayuso, J. Effects of 120 vs. 60 and 90 g/h Carbohydrate Intake during a Trail Marathon on Neuromuscular Function and High Intensity Run Capacity Recovery. Nutrients 2020, 12, 2094. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12072094

AMA Style

Urdampilleta A, Arribalzaga S, Viribay A, Castañeda-Babarro A, Seco-Calvo J, Mielgo-Ayuso J. Effects of 120 vs. 60 and 90 g/h Carbohydrate Intake during a Trail Marathon on Neuromuscular Function and High Intensity Run Capacity Recovery. Nutrients. 2020; 12(7):2094. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12072094

Chicago/Turabian Style

Urdampilleta, Aritz; Arribalzaga, Soledad; Viribay, Aitor; Castañeda-Babarro, Arkaitz; Seco-Calvo, Jesús; Mielgo-Ayuso, Juan. 2020. "Effects of 120 vs. 60 and 90 g/h Carbohydrate Intake during a Trail Marathon on Neuromuscular Function and High Intensity Run Capacity Recovery" Nutrients 12, no. 7: 2094. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12072094

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