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Open AccessArticle

Dietary Selenium Intakes and Musculoskeletal Function in Very Old Adults: Analysis of the Newcastle 85+ Study

1
The MRC-Versus Arthritis Centre for Integrated Research into Musculoskeletal Ageing (CIMA), Newcastle upon Tyne NE2 4HH, UK
2
Human Nutrition Research Centre, Population Health Sciences Institute, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE2 4HH, UK
3
EpiDoC Unit, NOVA Medical School, Universidade Nova de Lisboa (NMS-UNL), 1150-082 Lisbon, Portugal
4
Comprehensive Health Research Centre (CHRC), NOVA Medical School, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 1150-082 Lisbon, Portugal
5
Population Health Sciences Institute, Campus for Ageing and Vitality, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE4 5PL, UK
6
Department of Oncology and Metabolism, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S5 7AU, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(7), 2068; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12072068
Received: 14 June 2020 / Revised: 7 July 2020 / Accepted: 8 July 2020 / Published: 12 July 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Forgotten Dietary Minerals and Health)
Background: Selenium is a trace element essential for health. Severe selenium deficiencies are associated with poor musculoskeletal (MSK) function. However, the effects of moderate deficiency on MSK function, especially in older adults, is unclear. Objectives: To determine the associations between selenium intake and MSK function in very old adults. Methods: Selenium intake at baseline and, hand-grip strength (HGS) and timed-up-and-go (TUG) at four phases over 5 years, were available in 791 participants in the Newcastle 85+ Study, a community-based, longitudinal cohort of ≥ 85 year old individuals. We investigated relationships between selenium intake and HGS and TUG in cross-sectional analyses at baseline using multivariate analyses and, prospectively using linear mixed models to explore HGS and TUG changes over 5 years in association with baseline selenium intake. Results: At baseline, 53% of participants had selenium intakes that were classified as low. These individuals had 2.80 kg lower HGS and were 2.30 s slower performing the TUG, cross-sectionally. In multivariate, baseline analyses, selenium intake had no significant impact on HGS or TUG. Selenium intake had no significant effect on MSK function, prospectively. Conclusion: Low selenium intake is common among very old adults and, in cross-sectional analyses, is associated with poorer MSK function. View Full-Text
Keywords: dietary intake; selenium; very old adults; Newcastle 85+ Study; musculoskeletal function dietary intake; selenium; very old adults; Newcastle 85+ Study; musculoskeletal function
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Perri, G.; Mendonça, N.; Jagger, C.; Walsh, J.; Eastell, R.; Mathers, J.C.; Hill, T.R. Dietary Selenium Intakes and Musculoskeletal Function in Very Old Adults: Analysis of the Newcastle 85+ Study. Nutrients 2020, 12, 2068.

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