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Open AccessArticle

Differential Effects of Dietary Patterns on Advanced Glycation end Products: A Randomized Crossover Study

1
Department of Food and Nutrition, Institute of Agriculture and Life Science, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 52828, Korea
2
Health and Biomedical Innovation, Clinical and Health Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide SA 5000, Australia
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(6), 1767; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12061767
Received: 11 May 2020 / Revised: 2 June 2020 / Accepted: 8 June 2020 / Published: 12 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Clinical Nutrition)
Dietary advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are believed to contribute to pathogenesis of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The objective of this study was to determine if a diet high in red and processed meat and refined grains (HMD) would elevate plasma concentrations of protein-bound AGEs compared with an energy-matched diet high in whole grain, dairy, nuts and legumes (HWD). We conducted a randomized crossover trial with two 4-week weight-stable dietary interventions in 51 participants without type 2 diabetes (15 men and 36 women aged 35.1 ± 15.6 y; body mass index (BMI), 27.7 ± 6.9 kg/m2). Plasma concentrations of protein-bound Nε-(carboxymethyl) lysine (CML), Nε-(1-carboxyethyl) lysine (CEL) and Nδ-(5-hydro-5-methyl-4-imidazolon-2-yl)-ornithine (MG-H1) were measured by liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The HMD significantly increased plasma concentrations (nmol/mL) of CEL (1.367, 0.78 vs. 1.096, 0.65; p < 0.01; n = 48) compared with the HWD. No differences in CML and MG-H1 between HMD and HWD were observed. HMD increased plasma CEL concentrations compared with HWD in individuals without type 2 diabetes. View Full-Text
Keywords: dietary advanced glycation products; carboxymethyl–lysine (CML); carboxyethyl–lysine (CEL); methylglyoxal–hydroimidazalone (MG-H1) dietary advanced glycation products; carboxymethyl–lysine (CML); carboxyethyl–lysine (CEL); methylglyoxal–hydroimidazalone (MG-H1)
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Kim, Y.; Keogh, J.B.; Deo, P.; Clifton, P.M. Differential Effects of Dietary Patterns on Advanced Glycation end Products: A Randomized Crossover Study. Nutrients 2020, 12, 1767.

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