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Article

In “High-Risk” Infants with Sufficient Vitamin D Status at Birth, Infant Vitamin D Supplementation Had No Effect on Allergy Outcomes: A Randomized Controlled Trial

1
School of Medicine, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia
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Perth Children’s Hospital, 15 Hospital Avenue, Nedlands, WA 6009, Australia
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InVIVO Planetary Health, Group of the Worldwide Universities Network (WUN), 6010 Park Ave, West New York, NJ 07093, USA
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Telethon Kids Institute, University of Western Australia, 15 Hospital Avenue, Nedlands, WA 6009, Australia
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Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, WA 6009, Australia
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Department of Clinical Biochemistry, PathWest Laboratory Medicine, Queen Elizabeth II Medical Centre, Nedlands, WA 6009, Australia
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The ORIGINS Project, Telethon Kids Institute and Division of Paediatrics, University of Western Australia, 15 Hospital Avenue, Nedlands, WA 6009, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(6), 1747; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12061747
Received: 24 May 2020 / Revised: 7 June 2020 / Accepted: 9 June 2020 / Published: 11 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Nutritional Immunology)
Lower vitamin D status at birth and during infancy has been associated with increased incidence of eczema and food allergies. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of early infancy vitamin D supplementation on allergic disease outcomes in infants at “hereditary risk” of allergic disease, but who had sufficient vitamin D levels at birth. Here, we report the early childhood follow-up to 2.5 years of age of “high-risk” infants who participated in a double-blinded, randomized controlled trial. For inclusion in this trial, late gestation (36–40 weeks) maternal 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels needed to be ≥50 nmol/L. Infants were randomized to either oral vitamin D supplementation of 400 IU/day (n = 97) or a placebo (n = 98) for the first six months of life. Vitamin D levels and allergic disease outcomes were followed up. There were no statistically significant differences in incidence of any medically diagnosed allergic disease outcomes or allergen sensitization rates between the vitamin D-supplemented and placebo groups at either 1 year or at 2.5 years of age. In conclusion, for “allergy high-risk” infants who had sufficient vitamin D status at birth, early infancy oral vitamin D supplementation does not appear to reduce the development of early childhood allergic disease. View Full-Text
Keywords: allergen sensitization; allergic disease; eczema; hereditary risk; infant; prevention; randomized controlled trial; vitamin D; wheeze allergen sensitization; allergic disease; eczema; hereditary risk; infant; prevention; randomized controlled trial; vitamin D; wheeze
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MDPI and ACS Style

Rueter, K.; Jones, A.P.; Siafarikas, A.; Lim, E.-M.; Prescott, S.L.; Palmer, D.J. In “High-Risk” Infants with Sufficient Vitamin D Status at Birth, Infant Vitamin D Supplementation Had No Effect on Allergy Outcomes: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Nutrients 2020, 12, 1747. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12061747

AMA Style

Rueter K, Jones AP, Siafarikas A, Lim E-M, Prescott SL, Palmer DJ. In “High-Risk” Infants with Sufficient Vitamin D Status at Birth, Infant Vitamin D Supplementation Had No Effect on Allergy Outcomes: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Nutrients. 2020; 12(6):1747. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12061747

Chicago/Turabian Style

Rueter, Kristina, Anderson P. Jones, Aris Siafarikas, Ee-Mun Lim, Susan L. Prescott, and Debra J. Palmer 2020. "In “High-Risk” Infants with Sufficient Vitamin D Status at Birth, Infant Vitamin D Supplementation Had No Effect on Allergy Outcomes: A Randomized Controlled Trial" Nutrients 12, no. 6: 1747. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12061747

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