Next Article in Journal
The Effect of Lactobacillus plantarum 299v on Iron Status and Physical Performance in Female Iron-Deficient Athletes: A Randomized Controlled Trial
Next Article in Special Issue
Fiction is Sweet. The Impact of Media Consumption on the Development of Children’s Nutritional Knowledge and the Moderating Role of Parental Food-Related Mediation. A Longitudinal Study
Previous Article in Journal
Perceptions of Oncology Providers and Cancer Survivors on the Role of Nutrition in Cancer Care and Their Views on the “NutriCare” Program
Previous Article in Special Issue
The Frequency and Healthfulness of Food and Beverage Advertising in Movie Theatres: A Pilot Study Conducted in the United States and Canada
Article

Food Advertising to Children in New Zealand: A Critical Review of the Performance of a Self-Regulatory Complaints System Using a Public Health Law Framework

1
School of Population Health, University of Auckland, Auckland 1023, New Zealand
2
Auckland Regional Public Health Service, Auckland 1051, New Zealand
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(5), 1278; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12051278
Received: 4 March 2020 / Revised: 8 April 2020 / Accepted: 14 April 2020 / Published: 30 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Marketing and Dietary Behaviors among Children)
New Zealand has the second highest overweight and obese child population in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). This paper evaluates whether New Zealand’s self-regulatory controls on the advertising of unhealthy food and beverages to children and young people adequately protects children from the exposure to, and power of, such marketing in order to limit its impact on children’s food and beverage preferences. First, an analysis of the relevant New Zealand Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) Codes was conducted, including the ASA Complaints Board and Appeals Board decisions from 2017–2019 to determine the application of the Codes in practice. Second, a public health law framework was applied to the self-regulatory system. Of the 16 complaints assessed, 12 were not upheld, and only one was upheld under the Children and Young People’s Advertising Code (CYPA Code). Three complaints were upheld under the Advertising Standards Code (ASC) but not the CYPA Code. An analysis of the Codes and their interpretation by the Complaints Board found that many facets of the public health law framework were not met. The self-regulatory system does not adequately protect children from the exposure to, and power of, unhealthy food and beverage marketing, and government-led, comprehensive, and enforceable marketing restrictions are required. View Full-Text
Keywords: advertising; self-regulation; children; food advertising; self-regulation; children; food
MDPI and ACS Style

Sing, F.; Mackay, S.; Culpin, A.; Hughes, S.; Swinburn, B. Food Advertising to Children in New Zealand: A Critical Review of the Performance of a Self-Regulatory Complaints System Using a Public Health Law Framework. Nutrients 2020, 12, 1278. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12051278

AMA Style

Sing F, Mackay S, Culpin A, Hughes S, Swinburn B. Food Advertising to Children in New Zealand: A Critical Review of the Performance of a Self-Regulatory Complaints System Using a Public Health Law Framework. Nutrients. 2020; 12(5):1278. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12051278

Chicago/Turabian Style

Sing, Fiona, Sally Mackay, Angela Culpin, Sally Hughes, and Boyd Swinburn. 2020. "Food Advertising to Children in New Zealand: A Critical Review of the Performance of a Self-Regulatory Complaints System Using a Public Health Law Framework" Nutrients 12, no. 5: 1278. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12051278

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop