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Open AccessArticle

A Cecal Slurry Mouse Model of Sepsis Leads to Acute Consumption of Vitamin C in the Brain

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Division of Diabetes, Endocrinology, and Metabolism; Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232, USA
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Division of Allergy, Pulmonary, and Critical Care Medicine; Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232, USA
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Undergraduate Program in Neuroscience, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232, USA
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(4), 911; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12040911
Received: 2 March 2020 / Revised: 21 March 2020 / Accepted: 23 March 2020 / Published: 26 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Vitamin C: From Bench to Bedside)
Vitamin C (ascorbate, ASC) is a critical antioxidant in the body with specific roles in the brain. Despite a recent interest in vitamin C therapies for critical care medicine, little is known about vitamin C regulation during acute inflammation and critical illnesses such as sepsis. Using a cecal slurry (CS) model of sepsis in mice, we determined ASC and inflammatory changes in the brain following the initial treatment. ASC levels in the brain were acutely decreased by approximately 10% at 4 and 24 h post CS treatment. Changes were accompanied by a robust increase in liver ASC levels of up to 50%, indicating upregulation of synthesis beginning at 4 h and persisting up to 7 days post CS treatment. Several key cytokines interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin 1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), and chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 (CXCL1, KC/Gro) were also significantly elevated in the cortex at 4 h post CS treatment, although these levels returned to normal by 48 h. These data strongly suggest that ASC reserves are directly challenged throughout illness and recovery from sepsis. Given the timescale of this response, decreases in cortical ASC are likely driven by hyper-acute neuroinflammatory processes. However, future studies are required to confirm this relationship and to investigate how this deficiency may subsequently impact neuroinflammation. View Full-Text
Keywords: vitamin C; ascorbate; sepsis; brain; cecal slurry; inflammation; cytokines; mouse vitamin C; ascorbate; sepsis; brain; cecal slurry; inflammation; cytokines; mouse
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Consoli, D.C.; Jesse, J.J.; Klimo, K.R.; Tienda, A.A.; Putz, N.D.; Bastarache, J.A.; Harrison, F.E. A Cecal Slurry Mouse Model of Sepsis Leads to Acute Consumption of Vitamin C in the Brain. Nutrients 2020, 12, 911.

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