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Saccharin Supplementation Inhibits Bacterial Growth and Reduces Experimental Colitis in Mice

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Institute of Nutritional Medicine, Molecular Gastroenterology, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Lübeck, 23538 Lübeck, Germany
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Institute of Nutritional Medicine, Molecular Gastroenterology, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Lübeck and Institute of Anatomy, University of Lübeck, 23538 Lübeck, Germany
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Institute of Experimental Dermatology, Medical Systems Biology Group and Institute of Cardiogenetics, University of Lübeck, 23538 Lübeck, Germany
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Institute of Nutritional Medicine, Molecular Nutrition, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Lübeck, 23538 Lübeck, Germany
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Department of Infectious Diseases and Microbiology, University of Lübeck, 23538 Lübeck, Germany
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Lübeck Institute of Experimental Dermatology and Center for Research on Inflammation of the Skin, University of Lübeck, 23538 Lübeck, Germany
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Institute of Nutritional Medicine and 1st Department of Medicine, Section of Nutritional Medicine, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Lübeck, 23538 Lübeck, Germany
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Current address: Institute of Nutritional Sciences, Justus-Liebig-University Giessen, 35392 Giessen, Germany.
Nutrients 2020, 12(4), 1122; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12041122
Received: 3 March 2020 / Revised: 8 April 2020 / Accepted: 14 April 2020 / Published: 17 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Nutrition and Metabolism)
Non-caloric artificial sweeteners are frequently discussed as components of the “Western diet”, negatively modulating intestinal homeostasis. Since the artificial sweetener saccharin is known to depict bacteriostatic and microbiome-modulating properties, we hypothesized oral saccharin intake to influence intestinal inflammation and aimed at delineating its effect on acute and chronic colitis activity in mice. In vitro, different bacterial strains were grown in the presence or absence of saccharin. Mice were supplemented with saccharin before or after induction of acute or chronic colitis using dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) and the extent of colitis was assessed. Ex vivo, intestinal inflammation, fecal bacterial load and composition were studied by immunohistochemistry analyses, quantitative PCR, 16 S RNA PCR or next generation sequencing in samples collected from analyzed mice. In vitro, saccharin inhibited bacterial growth in a species-dependent manner. In vivo, oral saccharin intake reduced fecal bacterial load and altered microbiome composition, while the intestinal barrier was not obviously affected. Of note, DSS-induced colitis activity was significantly improved in mice after therapeutic or prophylactic treatment with saccharin. Together, this study demonstrates that oral saccharin intake decreases intestinal bacteria count and hence encompasses the capacity to reduce acute and chronic colitis activity in mice. View Full-Text
Keywords: saccharin; non-caloric artificial sweetener; inflammatory bowel disease; intestinal inflammation; colitis saccharin; non-caloric artificial sweetener; inflammatory bowel disease; intestinal inflammation; colitis
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MDPI and ACS Style

Sünderhauf, A.; Pagel, R.; Künstner, A.; Wagner, A.E.; Rupp, J.; Ibrahim, S.M.; Derer, S.; Sina, C. Saccharin Supplementation Inhibits Bacterial Growth and Reduces Experimental Colitis in Mice. Nutrients 2020, 12, 1122. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12041122

AMA Style

Sünderhauf A, Pagel R, Künstner A, Wagner AE, Rupp J, Ibrahim SM, Derer S, Sina C. Saccharin Supplementation Inhibits Bacterial Growth and Reduces Experimental Colitis in Mice. Nutrients. 2020; 12(4):1122. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12041122

Chicago/Turabian Style

Sünderhauf, Annika, René Pagel, Axel Künstner, Anika E. Wagner, Jan Rupp, Saleh M. Ibrahim, Stefanie Derer, and Christian Sina. 2020. "Saccharin Supplementation Inhibits Bacterial Growth and Reduces Experimental Colitis in Mice" Nutrients 12, no. 4: 1122. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12041122

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