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Screening and Treatment of Vitamin D Deficiency in UK Patients with Crohn’s Disease: Self-Reported Practice among Gastroenterologists

1
Nutrition Nurses, Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham, University Hospitals Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TH, UK
2
School of Nursing, Institute of Clinical Sciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK
3
Institute of Metabolism and Systems Research, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK
4
Gastroenterology, Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham, University Hospitals Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TH, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(4), 1064; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12041064
Received: 1 March 2020 / Revised: 7 April 2020 / Accepted: 9 April 2020 / Published: 11 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Clinical Nutrition)
Currently, there is no UK national recommendation to measure vitamin D levels in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Patients with IBD are at risk of developing vitamin D deficiency with the highest prevalence frequently reported in those with Crohn’s disease (CD). Treating vitamin D deficiency as part of CD management continues to be of interest. Our aim was to identify influences on practice and self-reported practice among British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG)-IBD section members in the screening and the treatment of vitamin D deficiency in patients with CD. A web-based survey was distributed via email to members of the BSG-IBD section. Reported screening practice was generally annual in those with a history of previous surgery related to CD or small bowel CD. A total of 83% of respondents (n = 64) thought that vitamin D levels should be routinely monitored in patients with CD. Treatments for mild/moderate deficiency included increased sunlight exposure (mean frequency = 21, SD = 15) and dietary advice (mean frequency = 22, SD = 14); in moderate/severe deficiency, oral supplementation was recommended (mean frequency = 14, SD = 13). Respondents reported factors most likely to influence practice, including clearer evidence and guidance. Well conducted studies in CD patients with identified vitamin D deficiency are needed to inform national guidance and clinical practice. View Full-Text
Keywords: Crohn’s disease; vitamin D deficiency; screening; clinical practice Crohn’s disease; vitamin D deficiency; screening; clinical practice
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Fletcher, J.; Swift, A.; Hewison, M.; Cooper, S.C. Screening and Treatment of Vitamin D Deficiency in UK Patients with Crohn’s Disease: Self-Reported Practice among Gastroenterologists. Nutrients 2020, 12, 1064.

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