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Open AccessArticle

Specific Dietary Components and Gut Microbiota Composition are Associated with Obesity in Children and Adolescents with Prader–Willi Syndrome

1
Institut de Recerca Sant Joan de Déu, 08950 Barcelona, Spain
2
Endocrinology Department, Hospital Sant Joan de Déu, 08950 Barcelona, Spain
3
ADM Lifesequencing, 46980 Valencia, Spain
4
Service of Pediatric Endocrinology, Parc Taulí Hospital Universitari, Institut d’Investigació i Innovació Parc Taulí I3PT, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08208 Sabadell, Spain
5
CIBERDEM, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, 28029 Madrid, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally.
Nutrients 2020, 12(4), 1063; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12041063
Received: 28 February 2020 / Revised: 5 April 2020 / Accepted: 10 April 2020 / Published: 11 April 2020
Prader–Willi syndrome is a rare genetic disorder associated with impaired body composition, hyperphagia, and excessive weight gain. Strict dietary restrictions from an early age is crucial to prevent or delay the early onset of obesity, which is the main driver of comorbidities in these patients. The aim of this study was to identify dietary and gut microbiota components closely linked to weight status of these patients. We studied a cohort of children and adolescents with genetic diagnosis of Prader–Willi syndrome (N = 31), in which we determined adiposity by Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and dietary composition with 4-day food records. Furthermore, we obtained fecal samples to assess microbiota composition by 16S sequencing. Multivariate regression models showed that body mass index standard deviation score (BMI-SDS) and body fat mass were directly associated with saturated fat intake and meat consumption, and inversely associated with fruit consumption. Furthermore, the gut microbiome from normal weight patients was characterized by higher phylogenetic diversity compared to those overweight or obese, with differential abundance of several genera, including Alistipes, Klebsiella, and Murimonas. Notably, Alistipes abundance was inversely correlated to adiposity, lipid and glucose homeostasis parameters, and meat intake. Our results suggest that limiting meat and increasing fruit intake might be beneficial for body weight management in children and adolescents with Prader–Willi syndrome. View Full-Text
Keywords: Prader–Willi syndrome; childhood obesity; adiposity; dietary intake; gut microbiota Prader–Willi syndrome; childhood obesity; adiposity; dietary intake; gut microbiota
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Garcia-Ribera, S.; Amat-Bou, M.; Climent, E.; Llobet, M.; Chenoll, E.; Corripio, R.; Ibáñez, L.; Ramon-Krauel, M.; Lerin, C. Specific Dietary Components and Gut Microbiota Composition are Associated with Obesity in Children and Adolescents with Prader–Willi Syndrome. Nutrients 2020, 12, 1063.

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