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Probiotics Dietary Supplementation for Modulating Endocrine and Fertility Microbiota Dysbiosis

by 1,2,* and 1,2,3,*
1
Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Granada, Campus of Cartuja, 18071 Granada, Spain
2
Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology “José Mataix”, Center of Biomedical Research, University of Granada, 18016 Armilla, Granada, Spain
3
IBS: Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria ibs., 18012 Granada, Spain
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(3), 757; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12030757
Received: 12 February 2020 / Revised: 6 March 2020 / Accepted: 9 March 2020 / Published: 13 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diet, Gut Microbiota and Metabolic Disorders)
Human microbiota seems to play a key role in endocrine and reproductive systems. Fortunately, microbiota reproductive dysbiosis start to be treated by probiotics using typical species from genus Lactobacillus. This work presents the compiled and analysed results from the most up-to-date information from clinical trials regarding microbiota, fertility, probiotics and oral route administration, reviewing open access scientific documents. These studies analyse the clinical impact of probiotics administered on several endocrine disorders’ manifestations in women: mastitis; vaginal dysbiosis; pregnancy complication disorders; and polycystic ovary syndrome. In all cases, the clinical modulation achieved by probiotics was evaluated positively through the improvement of specific disease outcomes with the exception of the pregnancy disorders studies, where the sample sizes results were statistically insufficient. High amounts of studies were discarded because no data were provided on specific probiotic strains, doses, impact on the individual autochthon microbiota, or data regarding specific hormonal values modifications and endocrine regulation effects. However, most of the selected studies with probiotics contained no protocolised administration. Therefore, we consider that intervention studies with probiotics might allocate the focus, not only in obtaining a final outcome, but in how to personalise the administration according to the disorder to be palliated. View Full-Text
Keywords: probiotics; doses; microbiota; endocrine; fertility; dysbiosis probiotics; doses; microbiota; endocrine; fertility; dysbiosis
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MDPI and ACS Style

López-Moreno, A.; Aguilera, M. Probiotics Dietary Supplementation for Modulating Endocrine and Fertility Microbiota Dysbiosis. Nutrients 2020, 12, 757. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12030757

AMA Style

López-Moreno A, Aguilera M. Probiotics Dietary Supplementation for Modulating Endocrine and Fertility Microbiota Dysbiosis. Nutrients. 2020; 12(3):757. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12030757

Chicago/Turabian Style

López-Moreno, Ana, and Margarita Aguilera. 2020. "Probiotics Dietary Supplementation for Modulating Endocrine and Fertility Microbiota Dysbiosis" Nutrients 12, no. 3: 757. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12030757

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