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Nutritional, Microbial, and Allergenic Changes during the Fermentation of Cashew ‘Cheese’ Product Using a Quinoa-Based Rejuvelac Starter Culture

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Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Schulich School of Medicine, Western University, London, ON N6A 5C1, Canada
2
Lawson Health Research Institute, 268 Grosvenor Street, London, ON N6C 2R5, Canada
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Nuts for Cheese, London, ON N5V 3K4, Canada
4
Department of Surgery, Western University, London, ON N6A 4V2, Canada
5
Brescia University College, London, ON N6G 1H2, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(3), 648; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12030648
Received: 23 January 2020 / Revised: 20 February 2020 / Accepted: 25 February 2020 / Published: 28 February 2020
Fermentation has been applied to a multitude of food types for preservation and product enhancing characteristics. Interest in the microbiome and healthy foods makes it important to understand the microbial processes involved in fermentation. This is particularly the case for products such as fermented cashew (Anacardium occidentale). We hereby describe the characterisation of cashew samples throughout an entire fermentation production process, starting at the quinoa starter inoculum (rejuvelac). The viable bacterial count was 108 -109 colony forming units/g. The nutritional composition changed marginally with regards to fats, carbohydrates, vitamins, and minerals. The rejuvelac starter culture was predominated by Pediococcus and Weissella genera. The ‘brie’ and ‘blue’ cashew products became dominated by Lactococcus, Pediococcus, and Weissella genera as the fermentation progressed. Cashew allergenicity was found to significantly decrease with fermentation of all the end-product types. For consumers concerned about allergic reactions to cashew nuts, these results suggested that a safer option is for products to be made by fermentation. View Full-Text
Keywords: fermentation; cashew; allergen; allergy; nuts; cheese fermentation; cashew; allergen; allergy; nuts; cheese
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MDPI and ACS Style

Chen, J.M.; Al, K.F.; Craven, L.J.; Seney, S.; Coons, M.; McCormick, H.; Reid, G.; O’Connor, C.; Burton, J.P. Nutritional, Microbial, and Allergenic Changes during the Fermentation of Cashew ‘Cheese’ Product Using a Quinoa-Based Rejuvelac Starter Culture. Nutrients 2020, 12, 648. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12030648

AMA Style

Chen JM, Al KF, Craven LJ, Seney S, Coons M, McCormick H, Reid G, O’Connor C, Burton JP. Nutritional, Microbial, and Allergenic Changes during the Fermentation of Cashew ‘Cheese’ Product Using a Quinoa-Based Rejuvelac Starter Culture. Nutrients. 2020; 12(3):648. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12030648

Chicago/Turabian Style

Chen, Jennifer M., Kait F. Al, Laura J. Craven, Shannon Seney, Margaret Coons, Heather McCormick, Gregor Reid, Colleen O’Connor, and Jeremy P. Burton. 2020. "Nutritional, Microbial, and Allergenic Changes during the Fermentation of Cashew ‘Cheese’ Product Using a Quinoa-Based Rejuvelac Starter Culture" Nutrients 12, no. 3: 648. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12030648

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