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Dietary Relationship with 24 h Urinary Iodine Concentrations of Young Adults in the Mountain West Region of the United States
Open AccessArticle

Breast Milk Iodine Concentration Is Associated with Infant Growth, Independent of Maternal Weight

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Division of Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
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Center for Human Growth and Development, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
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School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
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Metals Laboratory, Division of Clinical Biochemistry and Immunology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905, USA
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Division of Pediatric Endocrinology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(2), 358; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12020358
Received: 30 October 2019 / Revised: 26 January 2020 / Accepted: 27 January 2020 / Published: 30 January 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effects of Iodine Intake on Human Health)
In breastfed infants, human milk provides the primary source of iodine to meet demands during this vulnerable period of growth and development. Iodine is a key micronutrient that plays an essential role in hormone synthesis. Despite the importance of iodine, there is limited understanding of the maternal factors that influence milk iodine content and how milk iodine intake during infancy is related to postnatal growth. We examined breast milk samples from near 2 weeks and 2 months post-partum in a mother-infant dyad cohort of mothers with pre-pregnancy weight status defined by body mass index (BMI). Normal (NW, BMI < 25.0 kg/m2) is compared to overweight/obesity (OW/OB, BMI ≥ 25.0 kg/m2). The milk iodine concentration was determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. We evaluated the associations between iodine content at 2 weeks and infant anthropometrics over the first year of life using multivariable linear mixed modeling. Iodine concentrations generally decreased from 2 weeks to 2 months. We observed no significant difference in iodine based on maternal weight. A higher iodine concentration at 2 weeks was associated with a larger increase in infant weight-for-age and weight-for-length Z-score change per month from 2 weeks to 1 year. This pilot study shows that early iodine intake may influence infant growth trajectory independent of maternal pre-pregnancy weight status. View Full-Text
Keywords: iodine status; human milk; lactation; infant growth iodine status; human milk; lactation; infant growth
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MDPI and ACS Style

Ellsworth, L.; McCaffery, H.; Harman, E.; Abbott, J.; Gregg, B. Breast Milk Iodine Concentration Is Associated with Infant Growth, Independent of Maternal Weight. Nutrients 2020, 12, 358.

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