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Open AccessArticle

Effects of Extrinsic Wheat Fiber Supplementation on Fecal Weight; A Randomized Controlled Trial

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ZIEL—Institute for Food & Health, Technical University of Munich, Gregor-Mendel-Str. 2, 85354 Freising, Germany
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Else Kröner-Fresenius-Center of Nutritional Medicine, Technical University of Munich, Gregor-Mendel-Str. 2, 85354 Freising, Germany
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Leibniz-Institute for Food Systems Biology at the Technical University of Munich, Lise-Meitner-Straße 34, 85354 Freising, Germany
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Chair of Food Chemistry and Molecular Sensory Science, Technical University of Munich, Lise-Meitner-Straße 34, 85354 Freising, Germany
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Institute of Nutritional Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technical University of Munich, Georg-Brauchle-Ring 62, 80922 Munich Germany
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(2), 298; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12020298
Received: 16 December 2019 / Revised: 13 January 2020 / Accepted: 21 January 2020 / Published: 22 January 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Phytochemicals and Human Health)
Higher fiber intake may confer beneficial effects on health. Our objective was to investigate the impact of 10 g extrinsic wheat fiber on fecal bulk. Therefore, we performed two randomized intervention studies in which we provided extrinsic wheat fiber-enriched products or appropriate control products for five days together with normal diet. In one trial, 10 participants received fiber-enriched food products, whereas in the second study, 19 participants supplemented their daily diet with fiber-enriched drinks. The main outcome variable of this intervention was fecal bulk. Other outcomes were gut microbiota composition, short chain fatty acids in feces, and stool consistency and frequency. Fecal wet weight was significantly increased (p < 0.02) with extrinsic wheat fiber-enriched foods. In contrast, ingestion of extrinsic wheat fiber in the form of drinks did not significantly change fecal wet weight. In both groups, fecal dry weight was not altered upon extrinsic wheat fiber supplementation. However, the intake of fiber-enriched foods resulted in higher acetic acid levels in feces compared to fiber-enriched drinks. Regarding gut microbiota profiles, extrinsic wheat fiber-enriched food products were not associated with substantial alterations. In conclusion, 10 g extrinsic wheat fiber added to a normal diet increased fecal bulk if administered in a solid food matrix, but not if applied in the form of drinks. DRKS, DRKS00015792.Registered 30 October 2018. View Full-Text
Keywords: wheat fiber; fecal bulk; fecal wet weight; fecal dry weight; gut microbiota wheat fiber; fecal bulk; fecal wet weight; fecal dry weight; gut microbiota
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Brandl, B.; Lee, Y.-M.; Dunkel, A.; Hofmann, T.; Hauner, H.; Skurk, T. Effects of Extrinsic Wheat Fiber Supplementation on Fecal Weight; A Randomized Controlled Trial. Nutrients 2020, 12, 298.

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