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Plant Proteins: Assessing Their Nutritional Quality and Effects on Health and Physical Function

Scientific and Medical Affairs, Abbott Nutrition, 2900 Easton Square Place, Columbus, OH 43219, USA
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Nutrients 2020, 12(12), 3704; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12123704
Received: 2 November 2020 / Revised: 21 November 2020 / Accepted: 27 November 2020 / Published: 30 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant-Based Nutrition)
Consumer demand for plant protein-based products is high and expected to grow considerably in the next decade. Factors contributing to the rise in popularity of plant proteins include: (1) potential health benefits associated with increased intake of plant-based diets; (2) consumer concerns regarding adverse health effects of consuming diets high in animal protein (e.g., increased saturated fat); (3) increased consumer recognition of the need to improve the environmental sustainability of food production; (4) ethical issues regarding the treatment of animals; and (5) general consumer view of protein as a “positive” nutrient (more is better). While there are health and physical function benefits of diets higher in plant-based protein, the nutritional quality of plant proteins may be inferior in some respects relative to animal proteins. This review highlights the nutritional quality of plant proteins and strategies for wisely using them to meet amino acid requirements. In addition, a summary of studies evaluating the potential benefits of plant proteins for both health and physical function is provided. Finally, potential safety issues associated with increased intake of plant proteins are addressed. View Full-Text
Keywords: plant protein; protein quality; PDCAAS; DIAAS; vegetable protein; protein requirements; amino acids plant protein; protein quality; PDCAAS; DIAAS; vegetable protein; protein requirements; amino acids
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MDPI and ACS Style

Hertzler, S.R.; Lieblein-Boff, J.C.; Weiler, M.; Allgeier, C. Plant Proteins: Assessing Their Nutritional Quality and Effects on Health and Physical Function. Nutrients 2020, 12, 3704. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12123704

AMA Style

Hertzler SR, Lieblein-Boff JC, Weiler M, Allgeier C. Plant Proteins: Assessing Their Nutritional Quality and Effects on Health and Physical Function. Nutrients. 2020; 12(12):3704. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12123704

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hertzler, Steven R.; Lieblein-Boff, Jacqueline C.; Weiler, Mary; Allgeier, Courtney. 2020. "Plant Proteins: Assessing Their Nutritional Quality and Effects on Health and Physical Function" Nutrients 12, no. 12: 3704. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12123704

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