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Article

Increasing Expiratory Hydrogen in Lactose Intolerance Is Associated with Additional Food Intolerance/Malabsorption

1
General Internal Medicine Practice, Theodor Körnerstrasse 19b, A-8600 Bruck, Austria
2
Division of Immunology and Pathophysiology, Otto Loewi Research Center, Medical University of Graz, Heinrichstrasse 31a, A-8010 Graz, Austria
3
Clinical Institute of Medical and Chemical Laboratory Diagnosis, Medical University of Graz, Auenbruggerplatz 30, A-8036 Graz, Austria
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(12), 3690; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12123690
Received: 5 November 2020 / Revised: 25 November 2020 / Accepted: 27 November 2020 / Published: 30 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Unfolding New Evidence on Histamine Intolerance)
Single and/or combined food intolerance/malabsorption may cause nonspecific, functional gastrointestinal (GI) complaints. In lactose-intolerant patients we evaluated the influence of additional food intolerance/malabsorption with hydrogen (H2) breath tests. In a retrospective analysis of charts from 279 lactose-intolerant patients, we found 128 patients with only lactose intolerance (LIT). Then, we identified 106 LIT patients with additional histamine intolerance (HIT). Additionally, 45 LIT and HIT patients also had fructose malabsorption (FM). A hydrogen (H2) breath test was performed to evaluate LIT and FM. A serum diamine oxidase value of <10 U/mL and a response to a histamine-reduced diet was used to identify HIT. Using pairwise comparison with the Kruskal–Wallis test to associate the area under the curve (AUC) of LIT patients and, LIT with HIT, to LIT with HIT and FM it was found, that the exhaled hydrogen values were significantly higher in patients with two-fold and triple combined food intolerance/malabsorption (p < 0.004 and p < 0.001, respectively). Within the pool of 170 LIT patients with >20 ppm increase of expiratory H2 from baseline, there were 74 LIT-only patients, 60 LIT with HIT patients, and 36 LIT patients with additional HIT and FM. With the Kruskal–Wallis test AUCs demonstrated a significant difference between all three groups (p = 0.024). In patients with LIT, the presence of additional food intolerance/malabsorption, significantly increases expiratory H2 values. We demonstrate evidence, which may suggest HIT to embody an own GI disorder as food intolerance/malabsorption. View Full-Text
Keywords: lactose intolerance; hydrogen breath test; histamine intolerance; diamine oxidase; fructose malabsorption lactose intolerance; hydrogen breath test; histamine intolerance; diamine oxidase; fructose malabsorption
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MDPI and ACS Style

Schnedl, W.J.; Meier-Allard, N.; Lackner, S.; Enko, D.; Mangge, H.; Holasek, S.J. Increasing Expiratory Hydrogen in Lactose Intolerance Is Associated with Additional Food Intolerance/Malabsorption. Nutrients 2020, 12, 3690. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12123690

AMA Style

Schnedl WJ, Meier-Allard N, Lackner S, Enko D, Mangge H, Holasek SJ. Increasing Expiratory Hydrogen in Lactose Intolerance Is Associated with Additional Food Intolerance/Malabsorption. Nutrients. 2020; 12(12):3690. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12123690

Chicago/Turabian Style

Schnedl, Wolfgang J., Nathalie Meier-Allard, Sonja Lackner, Dietmar Enko, Harald Mangge, and Sandra J. Holasek 2020. "Increasing Expiratory Hydrogen in Lactose Intolerance Is Associated with Additional Food Intolerance/Malabsorption" Nutrients 12, no. 12: 3690. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12123690

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