Next Article in Journal
Considering Nature and Nurture in the Etiology and Prevention of Picky Eating: A Narrative Review
Previous Article in Journal
Micronutrient Status and Dietary Diversity of Women of Reproductive Age in Rural Pakistan
Article

The Effects of Non-Nutritive Artificial Sweeteners, Aspartame and Sucralose, on the Gut Microbiome in Healthy Adults: Secondary Outcomes of a Randomized Double-Blinded Crossover Clinical Trial

1
Richardson Centre for Functional Foods and Nutraceuticals, Department of Human Nutritional Sciences, University of Manitoba, 196 Innovation Drive, Winnipeg, MB R3T 2E1, Canada
2
Department of Community Health Sciences, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences Winnipeg, University of Manitoba, MB R3T 6C5, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(11), 3408; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12113408
Received: 3 October 2020 / Revised: 27 October 2020 / Accepted: 29 October 2020 / Published: 6 November 2020
Non-nutritive artificial sweeteners (NNSs) may have the ability to change the gut microbiota, which could potentially alter glucose metabolism. This study aimed to determine the effect of sucralose and aspartame consumption on gut microbiota composition using realistic doses of NNSs. Seventeen healthy participants between the ages of 18 and 45 years who had a body mass index (BMI) of 20–25 were selected. They undertook two 14-day treatment periods separated by a four-week washout period. The sweeteners consumed by each participant consisted of a standardized dose of 14% (0.425 g) of the acceptable daily intake (ADI) for aspartame and 20% (0.136 g) of the ADI for sucralose. Faecal samples collected before and after treatments were analysed for microbiome and short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). There were no differences in the median relative proportions of the most abundant bacterial taxa (family and genus) before and after treatments with both NNSs. The microbiota community structure also did not show any obvious differences. There were no differences in faecal SCFAs following the consumption of the NNSs. These findings suggest that daily repeated consumption of pure aspartame or sucralose in doses reflective of typical high consumption have minimal effect on gut microbiota composition or SCFA production. View Full-Text
Keywords: non-nutritive sweetener; aspartame; sucralose; gut microbiome; randomized clinical trial; protocol non-nutritive sweetener; aspartame; sucralose; gut microbiome; randomized clinical trial; protocol
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Ahmad, S.Y.; Friel, J.; Mackay, D. The Effects of Non-Nutritive Artificial Sweeteners, Aspartame and Sucralose, on the Gut Microbiome in Healthy Adults: Secondary Outcomes of a Randomized Double-Blinded Crossover Clinical Trial. Nutrients 2020, 12, 3408. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12113408

AMA Style

Ahmad SY, Friel J, Mackay D. The Effects of Non-Nutritive Artificial Sweeteners, Aspartame and Sucralose, on the Gut Microbiome in Healthy Adults: Secondary Outcomes of a Randomized Double-Blinded Crossover Clinical Trial. Nutrients. 2020; 12(11):3408. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12113408

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ahmad, Samar Y., James Friel, and Dylan Mackay. 2020. "The Effects of Non-Nutritive Artificial Sweeteners, Aspartame and Sucralose, on the Gut Microbiome in Healthy Adults: Secondary Outcomes of a Randomized Double-Blinded Crossover Clinical Trial" Nutrients 12, no. 11: 3408. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12113408

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop