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Article

Impact on Dietary Intake of Two Levels of Technology-Assisted Personalized Nutrition: A Randomized Trial

1
Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia
2
School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(11), 3334; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12113334
Received: 2 September 2020 / Revised: 20 October 2020 / Accepted: 22 October 2020 / Published: 29 October 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Nutrition and Public Health)
Advances in web and mobile technologies have created efficiencies relating to collection, analysis and interpretation of dietary intake data. This study compared the impact of two levels of nutrition support: (1) low personalization, comprising a web-based personalized nutrition feedback report generated using the Australian Eating Survey® (AES) food frequency questionnaire data; and (2) high personalization, involving structured video calls with a dietitian using the AES report plus dietary self-monitoring with text message feedback. Intake was measured at baseline and 12 weeks using the AES and diet quality using the Australian Recommended Food Score (ARFS). Fifty participants (aged 39.2 ± 12.5 years; Body Mass Index 26.4 ± 6.0 kg/m2; 86.0% female) completed baseline measures. Significant (p < 0.05) between-group differences in dietary changes favored the high personalization group for total ARFS (5.6 points (95% CI 1.3 to 10.0)) and ARFS sub-scales of meat (0.9 points (0.4 to 1.6)), vegetarian alternatives (0.8 points (0.1 to 1.4)), and dairy (1.3 points (0.3 to 2.3)). Additional significant changes in favor of the high personalization group occurred for proportion of energy intake derived from energy-dense, nutrient-poor foods (−7.2% (−13.8% to −0.5%)) and takeaway foods sub-group (−3.4% (−6.5% to 0.3%). Significant within-group changes were observed for 12 dietary variables in the high personalization group vs. one variable for low personalization. A higher level of personalized support combining the AES report with one-on-one dietitian video calls and dietary self-monitoring resulted in greater dietary change compared to the AES report alone. These findings suggest nutrition-related web and mobile technologies in combination with personalized dietitian delivered advice have a greater impact compared to when used alone. View Full-Text
Keywords: behavioral nutrition intervention; digital health; personalized nutrition; telehealth behavioral nutrition intervention; digital health; personalized nutrition; telehealth
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MDPI and ACS Style

Rollo, M.E.; Haslam, R.L.; Collins, C.E. Impact on Dietary Intake of Two Levels of Technology-Assisted Personalized Nutrition: A Randomized Trial. Nutrients 2020, 12, 3334. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12113334

AMA Style

Rollo ME, Haslam RL, Collins CE. Impact on Dietary Intake of Two Levels of Technology-Assisted Personalized Nutrition: A Randomized Trial. Nutrients. 2020; 12(11):3334. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12113334

Chicago/Turabian Style

Rollo, Megan E., Rebecca L. Haslam, and Clare E. Collins 2020. "Impact on Dietary Intake of Two Levels of Technology-Assisted Personalized Nutrition: A Randomized Trial" Nutrients 12, no. 11: 3334. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12113334

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