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Article

Education or Provision? A Comparison of Two School-Based Fruit and Vegetable Nutrition Education Programs in the Netherlands

1
Consumption and Healthy Lifestyles, Wageningen University and Research, 6700 EW Wageningen, The Netherlands
2
Priority Research Center for Physical Activity and Nutrition (PRCPAN), The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia
3
School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia
4
School of Environmental and Life Sciences (SELS), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(11), 3280; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12113280
Received: 15 September 2020 / Revised: 20 October 2020 / Accepted: 23 October 2020 / Published: 26 October 2020
A healthy diet is important for optimal child growth and development. School-based opportunities to encourage children to achieve healthy eating behaviors should be explored. Nutrition education programs can provide school children with classroom-based nutrition education and access to fruits and vegetables (FV). However, the effectiveness of specific program components implemented separately has not yet been comprehensively evaluated. The current study examined effectiveness of individual components of two programs targeting primary school children (n = 1460, n = 37 schools) aged 7–12 years. Nutrition knowledge and FV consumption were measured using a student questionnaire, and presence of school food policies was measured in the teachers’ questionnaire. A quasi-experimental design with three arms compared: (1) schools that implemented both programs: FV provision + education (n = 15), (2) schools that implemented the FV provision program only (n = 12), (3) schools that did not implement either program (n = 10). Outcomes were assessed pre-intervention (T0), during the intervention (T1), and 6 months post-intervention (T2). Results indicated a significant increase in nutrition knowledge for children attending schools that had participated in both programs, compared to control schools (p < 0.01), but no significant increase in FV intake. In schools without food policies, FV provision alone contributed to an increase in child FV intake (p < 0.05). View Full-Text
Keywords: nutrition education; FV provision; primary school children; nutrition knowledge nutrition education; FV provision; primary school children; nutrition knowledge
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MDPI and ACS Style

Verdonschot, A.; de Vet, E.; van Rossum, J.; Mesch, A.; Collins, C.E.; Bucher, T.; Haveman-Nies, A. Education or Provision? A Comparison of Two School-Based Fruit and Vegetable Nutrition Education Programs in the Netherlands. Nutrients 2020, 12, 3280. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12113280

AMA Style

Verdonschot A, de Vet E, van Rossum J, Mesch A, Collins CE, Bucher T, Haveman-Nies A. Education or Provision? A Comparison of Two School-Based Fruit and Vegetable Nutrition Education Programs in the Netherlands. Nutrients. 2020; 12(11):3280. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12113280

Chicago/Turabian Style

Verdonschot, Angeliek, Emely de Vet, Jolien van Rossum, Anouk Mesch, Clare E. Collins, Tamara Bucher, and Annemien Haveman-Nies. 2020. "Education or Provision? A Comparison of Two School-Based Fruit and Vegetable Nutrition Education Programs in the Netherlands" Nutrients 12, no. 11: 3280. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12113280

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