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The Social Stratification of Availability, Affordability, and Consumption of Food in Families with Preschoolers in Addis Ababa; The EAT Addis Study in Ethiopia

1
Addis Continental Institute of Public Health, 26751/1000 Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
2
Department of Women’s and Children Health, International Maternal and Child Health, Uppsala University, 751 85 Uppsala, Sweden
3
Institute of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, 196 Gondar, Ethiopia
4
Department of Human Geography, Lund University, 223 62 Lund, Sweden
5
School of Public Health, College of Health Sciences, Addis Ababa University, 1176 Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Nutrients 2020, 12(10), 3168; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12103168
Received: 13 September 2020 / Revised: 1 October 2020 / Accepted: 13 October 2020 / Published: 16 October 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Nutrition and Public Health)
The aim of this study was to understand the quality of diet being consumed among families in Addis Ababa, and to what extent social stratification and perceptions of availability and affordability affect healthy food consumption. Data were collected from 5467 households in a face-to-face interview with mothers/caretakers and analyzed using mixed effect logistic regression models. All family food groups, except fish were perceived to be available by more than 90% of the participants. The food groups cereals/nuts/seeds, other vegetables, and legumes were considered highly affordable (80%) and were the most consumed (>75%). Households with the least educated mothers and those in the lowest wealth quintile had the lowest perception of affordability and also consumption. Consumption of foods rich in micronutrients and animal sources were significantly higher among households with higher perceived affordability, the highest wealth quintile, and with mothers who had better education. Households in Addis Ababa were generally seen to have a monotonous diet, despite the high perceived availability of different food groups within the food environment. There is a considerable difference in consumption of nutrient-rich foods across social strata, hence the cities food policies need to account for social differences in order to improve the nutritional status of the community. View Full-Text
Keywords: social stratification; dietary diversity; availability; affordability; food environment; Ethiopia social stratification; dietary diversity; availability; affordability; food environment; Ethiopia
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Abdelmenan, S.; Berhane, H.Y.; Jirström, M.; Trenholm, J.; Worku, A.; Ekström, E.-C.; Berhane, Y. The Social Stratification of Availability, Affordability, and Consumption of Food in Families with Preschoolers in Addis Ababa; The EAT Addis Study in Ethiopia. Nutrients 2020, 12, 3168.

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