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Article

Preschool Healthy Food Policy Did Not Increase Percent of Food Wasted: Evidence from the Carolinas

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Department of Environmental Health & Engineering, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N Wolfe St, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
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Center for a Livable Future, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N Wolfe St, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
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Department of Health, Behavior and Society, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N Wolfe St, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
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Department of Health Policy and Management, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N Wolfe St, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
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Department of Exercise Science, University of South Carolina Arnold School of Public Health, 921 Assembly St, Columbia, SC 29208, USA
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Division of Biostatistics, Department of Public Health Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, 35 Cannon St, Charleston, SC 29415, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(10), 3024; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12103024
Received: 17 July 2020 / Revised: 10 September 2020 / Accepted: 18 September 2020 / Published: 2 October 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Policies and Diet)
This research evaluates the effects of a South Carolina (SC) policy, which changed the nutrition standards for foods served in early care and education (ECE) settings, on wasted food. A two-group pre-test/post-test evaluation was performed in ECE centers serving children age 3–5 from households with lower incomes in SC (n = 102 children from 34 centers, intervention) and North Carolina (NC; n = 99 children from 30 centers, comparison). Direct observation was performed to assess the quantity and kcal of food served and quantity and percent of food discarded, by food group and nutrient, enabling assessment of waste in the absence of intervention. Mixed-effects linear models were fit to estimate, by state, differences in change from baseline to post-implementation at the center level. Covariates were selected a priori, including center enrollment, racial composition, director educational attainment, years in operation, for-profit status, and Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) participation. Waste of food was high across states and time points. The policy was not associated with a change in percent of food discarded in SC compared to NC in adjusted analyses. View Full-Text
Keywords: food waste; early care and education; school nutrition standards; preschool; evaluation; policy food waste; early care and education; school nutrition standards; preschool; evaluation; policy
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MDPI and ACS Style

Neff, R.A.; Zaltz, D.A.; Hecht, A.A.; Pate, R.R.; Neelon, B.; O’Neill, J.R.; Benjamin-Neelon, S.E. Preschool Healthy Food Policy Did Not Increase Percent of Food Wasted: Evidence from the Carolinas. Nutrients 2020, 12, 3024. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12103024

AMA Style

Neff RA, Zaltz DA, Hecht AA, Pate RR, Neelon B, O’Neill JR, Benjamin-Neelon SE. Preschool Healthy Food Policy Did Not Increase Percent of Food Wasted: Evidence from the Carolinas. Nutrients. 2020; 12(10):3024. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12103024

Chicago/Turabian Style

Neff, Roni A., Daniel A. Zaltz, Amelie A. Hecht, Russell R. Pate, Brian Neelon, Jennifer R. O’Neill, and Sara E. Benjamin-Neelon 2020. "Preschool Healthy Food Policy Did Not Increase Percent of Food Wasted: Evidence from the Carolinas" Nutrients 12, no. 10: 3024. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12103024

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