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Review

Citrus Flavonoids as Promising Phytochemicals Targeting Diabetes and Related Complications: A Systematic Review of In Vitro and In Vivo Studies

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Research Center for Plants and Human Health, Institute of Urban Agriculture, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences (CAAS), Chengdu 600103, China
2
Chengdu National Agricultural Science and Technology Center, Chengdu 600103, China
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Postgraduate Program of Health Sciences (PPGCS), Federal University of Sergipe (UFS), Prof. João Cardoso Nascimento Campus, Aracaju, Sergipe 49060-108, Brazil
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Postgraduate Program of Physiological Sciences (PROCFIS), Federal University of Sergipe (UFS), Campus São Cristóvão, São Cristóvão, Sergipe 49100-000, Brazil
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Institute of Food Processing and Safety, College of Food Science, Sichuan Agricultural University, Ya’an 625014, China
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Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Food, Nutrition and Health, Department of Nutrition, School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080, China
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Department of Microbiology, St. Xavier’s College, Kathmandu 44600, Nepal
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Key Laboratory of Coarse Cereal Processing (Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs), School of Food and Biological Engineering, Chengdu University, Chengdu 610106, China
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Laboratory of Flavor and Chromatographic Analysis, Federal University of Sergipe, Campus São Cristóvão, São Cristóvão, Sergipe 49.100-000, Brazil
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(10), 2907; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12102907
Received: 25 August 2020 / Revised: 17 September 2020 / Accepted: 19 September 2020 / Published: 23 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effect of Phenolic Compounds on Human Health)
The consumption of plant-based food is important for health promotion, especially concerning the prevention and management of chronic diseases. Flavonoids are the main bioactive compounds in citrus fruits, with multiple beneficial effects, especially antidiabetic effects. We systematically review the potential antidiabetic action and molecular mechanisms of citrus flavonoids based on in vitro and in vivo studies. A search of the PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus, and Web of Science Core Collection databases for articles published since 2010 was carried out using the keywords citrus, flavonoid, and diabetes. All articles identified were analyzed, and data were extracted using a standardized form. The search identified 38 articles, which reported that 19 citrus flavonoids, including 8-prenylnaringenin, cosmosiin, didymin, diosmin, hesperetin, hesperidin, isosiennsetin, naringenin, naringin, neohesperidin, nobiletin, poncirin, quercetin, rhoifolin, rutin, sineesytin, sudachitin, tangeretin, and xanthohumol, have antidiabetic potential. These flavonoids regulated biomarkers of glycemic control, lipid profiles, renal function, hepatic enzymes, and antioxidant enzymes, and modulated signaling pathways related to glucose uptake and insulin sensitivity that are involved in the pathogenesis of diabetes and its related complications. Citrus flavonoids, therefore, are promising antidiabetic candidates, while their antidiabetic effects remain to be verified in forthcoming human studies. View Full-Text
Keywords: citrus; diabetes; flavonoids; inflammation; polyphenols citrus; diabetes; flavonoids; inflammation; polyphenols
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MDPI and ACS Style

Gandhi, G.R.; Vasconcelos, A.B.S.; Wu, D.-T.; Li, H.-B.; Antony, P.J.; Li, H.; Geng, F.; Gurgel, R.Q.; Narain, N.; Gan, R.-Y. Citrus Flavonoids as Promising Phytochemicals Targeting Diabetes and Related Complications: A Systematic Review of In Vitro and In Vivo Studies. Nutrients 2020, 12, 2907. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12102907

AMA Style

Gandhi GR, Vasconcelos ABS, Wu D-T, Li H-B, Antony PJ, Li H, Geng F, Gurgel RQ, Narain N, Gan R-Y. Citrus Flavonoids as Promising Phytochemicals Targeting Diabetes and Related Complications: A Systematic Review of In Vitro and In Vivo Studies. Nutrients. 2020; 12(10):2907. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12102907

Chicago/Turabian Style

Gandhi, Gopalsamy R., Alan B.S. Vasconcelos, Ding-Tao Wu, Hua-Bin Li, Poovathumkal J. Antony, Hang Li, Fang Geng, Ricardo Q. Gurgel, Narendra Narain, and Ren-You Gan. 2020. "Citrus Flavonoids as Promising Phytochemicals Targeting Diabetes and Related Complications: A Systematic Review of In Vitro and In Vivo Studies" Nutrients 12, no. 10: 2907. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12102907

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