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Open AccessArticle

Vitamin and Mineral Supplementation Practices in Preterm Infants: A Survey of Australian and New Zealand Neonatal Intensive and Special Care Units

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Department of Dietetics and Nutrition, The Royal Women’s Hospital, Melbourne, VIC 3052, Australia
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Department of Dietetics and Nutrition, Monash Children’s Hospital, Melbourne, VIC 3168, Australia
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Department of Rural Health, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle, Tamworth, NSW 2340, Australia
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Department of Dietetics and Nutrition, Tamworth Rural Referral Hospital, Tamworth, NSW 2340, Australia
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Department of Dietetics and Food Services, Mater Group, South Brisbane, QLD 4101, Australia
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Department of Dietetics and Nutrition, Fiona Stanley Hospital, Perth, WA 6150, Australia
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Department of Dietetics and Nutrition, Starship Child Health, Auckland City Hospital, Auckland 1023, New Zealand
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Liggins Institute, University of Auckland, Auckland 1142, New Zealand
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(1), 51; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12010051
Received: 28 November 2019 / Revised: 14 December 2019 / Accepted: 19 December 2019 / Published: 23 December 2019
Preterm infants are at increased risk of micronutrient deficiencies as a result of low body stores, maternal deficiencies, and inadequate supplementations. The aim of this survey was to investigate current vitamin and mineral supplementation practices and compare these with published recommendations and available evidence on dosages and long-term outcomes of supplementations in preterm infants. In 2018, a two-part electronic survey was emailed to 50 Australasian Neonatal Dietitians Network (ANDiN) member and nonmember dietitians working in neonatal units in Australia and New Zealand. For inpatients, all units prescribed between 400 and 500 IU/day vitamin D, compared to a recommended intake range of 400–1000 IU/day. Two units prescribed 900–1000 IU/day at discharge. For iron, 83% of respondents prescribed within the recommended intake range of 2–3 mg/kg/day for inpatients. Up to 10% of units prescribed 6 mg/kg/day for inpatients and at discharge. More than one-third of units reported routine supplementations of other micronutrients, including calcium, phosphate, vitamin E, and folic acid. There was significant variation between neonatal units in vitamin and mineral supplementation practices, which may contribute to certain micronutrient intakes above or below recommended ranges for gestational ages or birth weights. The variations in practice are in part due to differences in recommended vitamin and mineral intakes between expert groups and a lack of evidence supporting the recommendations for supplementations. View Full-Text
Keywords: neonatal; preterm; vitamin; mineral; supplementations neonatal; preterm; vitamin; mineral; supplementations
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MDPI and ACS Style

Oliver, C.; Watson, C.; Crowley, E.; Gilroy, M.; Page, D.; Weber, K.; Messina, D.; Cormack, B. Vitamin and Mineral Supplementation Practices in Preterm Infants: A Survey of Australian and New Zealand Neonatal Intensive and Special Care Units. Nutrients 2020, 12, 51.

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