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Open AccessArticle

Prenatal Choline Supplementation during High-Fat Feeding Improves Long-Term Blood Glucose Control in Male Mouse Offspring

1
PhD Program in Biochemistry, The Graduate Center CUNY (City University of New York), New York, NY 10016, USA
2
Department of Health and Nutrition Sciences, Brooklyn College of the City University of New York, Brooklyn, NY 11210, USA
3
Department of Public Health, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100069, China
4
Department of Biology, Brooklyn College of the City University of New York, Brooklyn, NY 11210, USA
5
Department of Chemistry, Brooklyn College of the City University of New York, Brooklyn, NY 11210, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(1), 144; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12010144
Received: 26 November 2019 / Revised: 25 December 2019 / Accepted: 2 January 2020 / Published: 4 January 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Choline: An Essential Nutrient for Human Health)
Maternal obesity increases the risk of metabolic dysregulation in rodent offspring, especially when offspring are exposed to a high-fat (HF), obesogenic diet later in life. We previously demonstrated that maternal choline supplementation (MCS) in HF-fed mouse dams during gestation prevents fetal overgrowth and excess adiposity. In this study, we examined the long-term metabolic influence of MCS. C57BL/6J mice were fed a HF diet with or without choline supplementation prior to and during gestation. After weaning, their pups were exposed to either a HF or control diet for 6 weeks before measurements. Prenatal and post-weaning dietary treatments led to sexually dimorphic responses. In male offspring, while post-weaning HF led to impaired fasting glucose and worse glucose tolerance (p < 0.05), MCS in HF dams (HFCS) attenuated these changes. HFCS (versus maternal normal fat control) appeared to improve metabolic functioning of visceral adipose tissue during post-weaning HF feeding, preventing the elevation in leptin and increasing (p < 0.05) mRNA expression of insulin receptor substrate 1 (Irs1) that promotes peripheral insulin signaling in male offspring. In contrast, MCS had minimal effects on metabolic outcomes of female offspring. In conclusion, MCS during HF feeding in mice improves long-term blood glucose homeostasis in male offspring when they are faced with a postnatal obesogenic environment. View Full-Text
Keywords: choline; maternal obesity; blood glucose; adipose tissue; insulin signaling choline; maternal obesity; blood glucose; adipose tissue; insulin signaling
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Korsmo, H.W.; Edwards, K.; Dave, B.; Jack-Roberts, C.; Yu, H.; Saxena, A.; Salvador, M.; Dembitzer, M.; Phagoora, J.; Jiang, X. Prenatal Choline Supplementation during High-Fat Feeding Improves Long-Term Blood Glucose Control in Male Mouse Offspring. Nutrients 2020, 12, 144.

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