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Open AccessArticle

Obesity Status Affects the Relationship Between Protein Intake and Insulin Sensitivity in Late Pregnancy

1
Arkansas Children’s Nutrition Center, Little Rock, AR 72202, USA
2
Arkansas Children’s Research Institute, Little Rock, AR 72202, USA
3
Department of Pediatrics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205, USA
4
Department of Biostatistics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205, USA
5
Department of Geriatrics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Co-Senior Authors.
Nutrients 2019, 11(9), 2190; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11092190
Received: 15 August 2019 / Revised: 1 September 2019 / Accepted: 6 September 2019 / Published: 11 September 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Protein Metabolism and Glucose Homeostasis)
The purpose of this study was to determine the associations between amount and type of dietary protein intake and insulin sensitivity in late pregnancy, in normal weight and overweight women (29.8 ± 0.2 weeks gestation, n = 173). A 100-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was administered following an overnight fast to estimate the metabolic clearance rate of glucose (MCR, mg·kg−1·min−1) using four different equations accounting for the availability of blood samples. Total (TP), animal (AP), and plant (PP) protein intakes were assessed using a 3-day food record. Two linear models with MCR as the response variable were fitted to the data to estimate the relationship of protein intake to insulin sensitivity either unadjusted or adjusted for early pregnancy body mass index (BMI) because of the potential of BMI to influence this relationship. There was a positive association between TP (β = 1.37, p = 0.002) and PP (β = 4.44, p < 0.001) intake in the last trimester of pregnancy and insulin sensitivity that weakened when accounting for early pregnancy BMI. However, there was no relationship between AP intake and insulin sensitivity (β = 0.95, p = 0.08). Therefore, early pregnancy BMI may be a better predictor of insulin sensitivity than dietary protein intake in late pregnancy. View Full-Text
Keywords: pregnancy; protein; insulin sensitivity; glucose; obesity; plant protein; animal protein; glucose; insulin resistance pregnancy; protein; insulin sensitivity; glucose; obesity; plant protein; animal protein; glucose; insulin resistance
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Allman, B.R.; Diaz Fuentes, E.; Williams, D.K.; Turner, D.E.; Andres, A.; Børsheim, E. Obesity Status Affects the Relationship Between Protein Intake and Insulin Sensitivity in Late Pregnancy. Nutrients 2019, 11, 2190.

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