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Open AccessEditorial

The Mediterranean Diet and Cancer: What Do Human and Molecular Studies Have to Say about It?

by Álvaro Hernáez 1,2,* and Ramón Estruch 2,3,*
1
August Pi i Sunyer Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBAPS), 08036 Barcelona, Spain
2
CIBER of Pathophysiology of Obesity and Nutrition (CIBEROBN), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, 28029 Madrid, Spain
3
Department of Internal Medicine, Hospital Clínic, University of Barcelona, 08036 Barcelona, Spain
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(9), 2155; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11092155
Received: 31 August 2019 / Revised: 4 September 2019 / Accepted: 5 September 2019 / Published: 9 September 2019
Note: In lieu of an abstract, this is an excerpt from the first page.

Mediterranean diet (MD) is a well-known healthy dietary pattern, linked to: (1) high intakes of olive oil as main the culinary fat, plant-based foods (fruits, vegetables, legumes, whole grains, tree nuts, and seeds), and fish; and (2) a moderate consumption of white meat, eggs, dairy products such as yogurt and cheese, and wine always with meals [...] View Full-Text
Keywords: Mediterranean diet; cancer; meta-analysis; prospective human studies; molecular mechanisms Mediterranean diet; cancer; meta-analysis; prospective human studies; molecular mechanisms
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Hernáez, Á.; Estruch, R. The Mediterranean Diet and Cancer: What Do Human and Molecular Studies Have to Say about It? Nutrients 2019, 11, 2155.

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