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Ranked Importance of Childhood Obesity Determinants: Parents’ Views across Ethnicities in New Zealand

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A Better Start—National Science Challenge, Auckland 1142, New Zealand
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School of Health Sciences, College of Health, Massey University, Auckland 0632, New Zealand
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TAHA Well Pacific Mother and Infant Service, University of Auckland, Auckland 1142, New Zealand
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Liggins Institute, University of Auckland, Auckland 1142, New Zealand
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Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Uppsala University, 751 85 Uppsala, Sweden
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Dunedin School of Medicine, University of Otago, Dunedin 9054, New Zealand
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Centre for Longitudinal Research—He Ara ki Mua, School of Population Health, University of Auckland, Auckland 1743, New Zealand
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Centre for Pacific Health & Development Research, Auckland University of Technology, Auckland 1142, New Zealand
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(9), 2145; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11092145
Received: 26 July 2019 / Revised: 27 August 2019 / Accepted: 2 September 2019 / Published: 7 September 2019
Māori, Pacific, Indian, and New Zealand European pre-school children’s caregivers’ views on determinants of childhood obesity are needed to inform strategies that will reduce disparities in prevalence. Nineteen focus groups were conducted to explore the relative influence of factors contributing to body weight in children. Predetermined and participant-suggested factors were ranked. Discussion data were inductively analysed. The cost of healthy foods was the highest ranked factor across all groups. Ranked similarly were ease of access to takeaways and lack of time for food preparation. Cultural factors followed by screen time induced sedentariness in children and lack of time to ensure children exercised was next. Participant-raised factors included lack of familial, social, and health promotion support, and others’ behaviour and attitudes negatively impacting what children ate. All groups rejected stereotyping that blamed culture for higher obesity rates. Compared to the Māori and NZ European groups, the Pacific Island and Indian participants spoke of losing culture, missing extended family support, and not having access to culturally appropriate nutrition education or social support and services. Public health policies need to mitigate the negative effects of economic deprivation on food insecurity. Complementary interventions that increase access to healthier meal choices more often are needed. View Full-Text
Keywords: childhood obesity; social determinants of health; cultural; ethnicity; Māori health; Pacific health childhood obesity; social determinants of health; cultural; ethnicity; Māori health; Pacific health
MDPI and ACS Style

Glover, M.; Wong, S.F.; Fa’alili-Fidow, J.; Derraik, J.G.B.; Taylor, R.W.; Morton, S.M.B.; Tautolo, E.S.; Cutfield, W.S. Ranked Importance of Childhood Obesity Determinants: Parents’ Views across Ethnicities in New Zealand. Nutrients 2019, 11, 2145.

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