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Open AccessArticle

Chilled Potatoes Decrease Postprandial Glucose, Insulin, and Glucose-dependent Insulinotropic Peptide Compared to Boiled Potatoes in Females with Elevated Fasting Glucose and Insulin

1
Department of Nutrition and Food Services, Texas Woman’s University, 6700 Fannin Street, Houston, TX 77030, USA
2
Office of Research and Sponsored Programs, Texas Woman’s University, 6700 Fannin Street, Houston, TX 77030, USA
3
Center for Design and Research, Texas Woman’s University, 6700 Fannin Street, Houston, TX 77030, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(9), 2066; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11092066
Received: 11 August 2019 / Revised: 29 August 2019 / Accepted: 30 August 2019 / Published: 3 September 2019
Resistant starch (RS) has been shown to improve postprandial glycemia and insulin sensitivity in adults with metabolic syndrome. RS is found naturally in potatoes, where the amount varies based on cooking method and serving temperature. Thirty females with a mean BMI of 32.8 ± 3.7 kg/m2, fasting glucose of 110.5 mg/dL, and insulin of 10.3 µIU/L, completed this randomized, crossover study. A quantity of 250 g of boiled (low RS) and baked then chilled (high RS) russet potatoes were consumed on two separate occasions. Glycemic (glucose and insulin) and incretin response, subjective satiety, and dietary intake were measured. Results showed that the chilled potato elicited significant reductions at 15 and 30 min in glucose (4.8% and 9.2%), insulin (25.8% and 22.6%), and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) (41.1% and 37.6%), respectively. The area under the curve for insulin and GIP were significantly lower after the chilled potato, but no differences were seen in glucose, glucagon-like peptide-1, and peptide YY, or overall subjective satiety. A higher carbohydrate and glycemic index but lower fat diet was consumed 48-hours following the chilled potato than the boiled potato. This study demonstrates that consuming chilled potatoes higher in RS can positively impact the glycemic response in females with elevated fasting glucose and insulin. View Full-Text
Keywords: glucose homeostasis; resistant starch; incretins; subjective satiety; dietary intake glucose homeostasis; resistant starch; incretins; subjective satiety; dietary intake
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MDPI and ACS Style

Patterson, M.A; Fong, J.N.; Maiya, M.; Kung, S.; Sarkissian, A.; Nashef, N.; Wang, W. Chilled Potatoes Decrease Postprandial Glucose, Insulin, and Glucose-dependent Insulinotropic Peptide Compared to Boiled Potatoes in Females with Elevated Fasting Glucose and Insulin. Nutrients 2019, 11, 2066.

AMA Style

Patterson MA, Fong JN, Maiya M, Kung S, Sarkissian A, Nashef N, Wang W. Chilled Potatoes Decrease Postprandial Glucose, Insulin, and Glucose-dependent Insulinotropic Peptide Compared to Boiled Potatoes in Females with Elevated Fasting Glucose and Insulin. Nutrients. 2019; 11(9):2066.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Patterson, Mindy A; Fong, Joy N.; Maiya, Madhura; Kung, Stephanie; Sarkissian, Araz; Nashef, Nezar; Wang, Wanyi. 2019. "Chilled Potatoes Decrease Postprandial Glucose, Insulin, and Glucose-dependent Insulinotropic Peptide Compared to Boiled Potatoes in Females with Elevated Fasting Glucose and Insulin" Nutrients 11, no. 9: 2066.

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