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Open AccessArticle

Does an Age-Specific Treatment Program Augment the Efficacy of a Cognitive-Behavioral Weight Loss Program in Adolescence and Young Adulthood? Results from a Controlled Study

Department of Psychology, University of Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht-Str. 24–25, 14476 Potsdam, Germany
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Nutrients 2019, 11(9), 2053; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11092053
Received: 30 July 2019 / Revised: 22 August 2019 / Accepted: 23 August 2019 / Published: 2 September 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Intake and Eating Behavior in Children)
Research on weight-loss interventions in emerging adulthood is warranted. Therefore, a cognitive-behavioral group treatment (CBT), including development-specific topics for adolescents and young adults with obesity (YOUTH), was developed. In a controlled study, we compared the efficacy of this age-specific CBT group intervention to an age-unspecific CBT group delivered across ages in an inpatient setting. The primary outcome was body mass index standard deviation score (BMI-SDS) over the course of one year; secondary outcomes were health-related and disease-specific quality of life (QoL). 266 participants aged 16 to 21 years (65% females) were randomized. Intention-to-treat (ITT) and per-protocol analyses (PPA) were performed. For both group interventions, we observed significant and clinically relevant improvements in BMI-SDS and QoL over the course of time with small to large effect sizes. Contrary to our hypothesis, the age-specific intervention was not superior to the age-unspecific CBT-approach. View Full-Text
Keywords: emerging adults; adolescents; behavioral weight loss; obesity; controlled trial; quality of life emerging adults; adolescents; behavioral weight loss; obesity; controlled trial; quality of life
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Warschburger, P.; Zitzmann, J. Does an Age-Specific Treatment Program Augment the Efficacy of a Cognitive-Behavioral Weight Loss Program in Adolescence and Young Adulthood? Results from a Controlled Study. Nutrients 2019, 11, 2053.

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