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Communication

Metabolic Endotoxemia: A Potential Underlying Mechanism of the Relationship between Dietary Fat Intake and Risk for Cognitive Impairments in Humans?

1
Team Lifelong Exposure Health and Aging, Inserm, Bordeaux Population Health Research Center, Univ. Bordeaux U1219, F-33000 Bordeaux, France
2
Univ-Lyon, CarMeN Laboratory, INRA U1397, Inserm U1060, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, INSA Lyon, Charles Mérieux Medical School, FR-69600 Oullins, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(8), 1887; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11081887
Received: 31 May 2019 / Revised: 17 July 2019 / Accepted: 9 August 2019 / Published: 13 August 2019
(1) Background: Nutrition is a major lifestyle factor that can prevent the risk of cognitive impairment and dementia. Diet-induced metabolic endotoxemia has been proposed as a major root cause of inflammation and these pathways emerge as detrimental factors of healthy ageing. The aim of this paper was to update research focusing on the relationship between a fat-rich diet and endotoxemia, and to discuss the potential role of endotoxemia in cognitive performances. (2) Methods: We conducted a non-systematic literature review based on the PubMed database related to fat-rich meals, metabolic endotoxemia and cognitive disorders including dementia in humans. A total of 40 articles out of 942 in the first screening met the inclusion criteria. (3) Results: Evidence suggested that a fat-rich diet, depending on its quality, quantity and concomitant healthy food components, could influence metabolic endotoxemia. Since only heterogeneous cross-sectional studies are available, it remains unclear to what extent endotoxemia could be associated or not with cognitive disorders and dementia. (4) Conclusions: A fat-rich diet has the capability to provide significant increases in circulating endotoxins, which highlights nutritional strategies as a promising area for future research on inflammatory-associated diseases. The role of endotoxemia in cognitive disorders and dementia remains unclear and deserves further investigation. View Full-Text
Keywords: nutrition; dietary fat; high-fat; endotoxemia; lipopolysaccharide; Alzheimer’s disease; dementia; humans nutrition; dietary fat; high-fat; endotoxemia; lipopolysaccharide; Alzheimer’s disease; dementia; humans
MDPI and ACS Style

André, P.; Laugerette, F.; Féart, C. Metabolic Endotoxemia: A Potential Underlying Mechanism of the Relationship between Dietary Fat Intake and Risk for Cognitive Impairments in Humans? Nutrients 2019, 11, 1887. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11081887

AMA Style

André P, Laugerette F, Féart C. Metabolic Endotoxemia: A Potential Underlying Mechanism of the Relationship between Dietary Fat Intake and Risk for Cognitive Impairments in Humans? Nutrients. 2019; 11(8):1887. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11081887

Chicago/Turabian Style

André, Perrine; Laugerette, Fabienne; Féart, Catherine. 2019. "Metabolic Endotoxemia: A Potential Underlying Mechanism of the Relationship between Dietary Fat Intake and Risk for Cognitive Impairments in Humans?" Nutrients 11, no. 8: 1887. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11081887

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