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Association between Brain and Plasma Glutamine Levels in Healthy Young Subjects Investigated by MRS and LC/MS

1
National Institute of Radiological Sciences, National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology, Chiba 263-8555, Japan
2
Animal Imaging and Technology Core (AIT), Center for Biomedical Imaging (CIBM), Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne, Switzerland
3
Douglas Mental Health University Institute and Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal, QC H4H 1R3, Canada
4
Department of Radiological Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Komazawa University, Tokyo 154-8525, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(7), 1649; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11071649
Received: 2 June 2019 / Revised: 9 July 2019 / Accepted: 17 July 2019 / Published: 19 July 2019
Both glutamine (Gln) and glutamate (Glu) are known to exist in plasma and brain. However, despite the assumed relationship between brain and plasma, no studies have clarified the association between them. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was sequentially performed twice, with a 60-min interval, on 10 males and 10 females using a 3T scanner. Blood samples for liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC/MS) to measure Gln and Glu concentrations in plasma were collected during the time interval between the two MRS sessions. MRS voxels of interest were localized at the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and cerebellum (Cbll) and measured by the SPECIAL sequence. Spearman’s correlation coefficient was used to examine the association between brain and plasma metabolites. The Gln concentrations in PCC (mean of two measurements) were positively correlated with Gln concentrations in plasma (p < 0.01, r = 0.72). However, the Glu concentrations in the two regions were not correlated with those in plasma. Consideration of the different dynamics of Gln and Glu between plasma and brain is crucial when addressing the pathomechanism and therapeutic strategies for brain disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease and hepatic encephalopathy. View Full-Text
Keywords: magnetic resonance spectroscopy; glutamine; glutamate; LC/MS; posterior cingulate gyrus; cerebellum magnetic resonance spectroscopy; glutamine; glutamate; LC/MS; posterior cingulate gyrus; cerebellum
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MDPI and ACS Style

Takado, Y.; Sato, N.; Kanbe, Y.; Tomiyasu, M.; Xin, L.; Near, J.; Yoshikawa, K.; Sahara, N.; Higashi, T.; Suhara, T.; Higuchi, M.; Obata, T. Association between Brain and Plasma Glutamine Levels in Healthy Young Subjects Investigated by MRS and LC/MS. Nutrients 2019, 11, 1649. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11071649

AMA Style

Takado Y, Sato N, Kanbe Y, Tomiyasu M, Xin L, Near J, Yoshikawa K, Sahara N, Higashi T, Suhara T, Higuchi M, Obata T. Association between Brain and Plasma Glutamine Levels in Healthy Young Subjects Investigated by MRS and LC/MS. Nutrients. 2019; 11(7):1649. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11071649

Chicago/Turabian Style

Takado, Yuhei; Sato, Naoto; Kanbe, Yuta; Tomiyasu, Moyoko; Xin, Lijing; Near, Jamie; Yoshikawa, Kohki; Sahara, Naruhiko; Higashi, Tatsuya; Suhara, Tetsuya; Higuchi, Makoto; Obata, Takayuki. 2019. "Association between Brain and Plasma Glutamine Levels in Healthy Young Subjects Investigated by MRS and LC/MS" Nutrients 11, no. 7: 1649. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11071649

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