Next Article in Journal
Nutritional Quality of Breakfast Consumed by the Low-Income Population in Brazil: A Nationwide Cross-Sectional Survey
Next Article in Special Issue
Assessing the Lifetime Cost-Effectiveness of Low-Protein Infant Formula as Early Obesity Prevention Strategy: The CHOP Randomized Trial
Previous Article in Journal
Increasing the Dose and/or Repeating Faecal Microbiota Transplantation (FMT) Increases the Response in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)
Previous Article in Special Issue
Effects of Intermittent Energy Restriction Combined with a Mediterranean Diet on Reducing Visceral Adiposity: A Randomized Active Comparator Pilot Study
Open AccessArticle

Improving Nutrition Care, Delivery, and Intakes Among Hospitalised Patients: A Mixed Methods, Integrated Knowledge Translation Study

1
School of Allied Health Sciences, Griffith University; Gold Coast Campus, Southport QLD 4222, Australia
2
Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Griffith University; Gold Coast Campus, Southport QLD 4222, Australia
3
Gold Coast Hospital and Health Service; 1 Hospital Blvd, Southport QLD 4219, Australia
4
School of Nursing and Midwifery, Griffith University; Gold Coast Campus, Southport QLD 4222, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(6), 1417; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11061417
Received: 28 May 2019 / Revised: 17 June 2019 / Accepted: 18 June 2019 / Published: 24 June 2019
Malnutrition is a common and complex problem in hospitals. This study used an integrated knowledge translation approach to develop, implement, and evaluate a multifaceted, tailored intervention to improve nutrition care, delivery, and intake among acute medical inpatients. This observational, pre-post study was conducted in a medical ward at a public hospital in Australia. The intervention was co-developed with key stakeholders and targeted three levels: individuals (nutrition intake magnets at patient bedsides), the ward (multidisciplinary hospital staff training), and the organisation (foodservice system changes). Observational data were collected pre- and post-intervention on patient demographics, food intakes, and the mealtime environment. Data were entered into SPSS and analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Ethical approval was gained through the hospital and university ethics committees. A total of 207 patients were observed; 116 pre- and 91 post-intervention. After intervention implementation, patients’ mean energy and protein intakes (in proportion to their estimated requirements) were significantly higher and the number of patients eating adequately doubled (p < 0.05). In summary, a multifaceted, pragmatic intervention, tailored to the study context and developed and implemented alongside hospital staff and patients, seemed to be effective in improving nutrition practices and patient nutrition intakes on an acute medical ward. View Full-Text
Keywords: clinical nutrition; complex interventions; hospitalised patients; knowledge translation; malnutrition; nutrition care; research co-development clinical nutrition; complex interventions; hospitalised patients; knowledge translation; malnutrition; nutrition care; research co-development
MDPI and ACS Style

Roberts, S.; Williams, L.T.; Sladdin, I.; Neil, H.; Hopper, Z.; Jenkins, J.; Spencer, A.; Marshall, A.P. Improving Nutrition Care, Delivery, and Intakes Among Hospitalised Patients: A Mixed Methods, Integrated Knowledge Translation Study. Nutrients 2019, 11, 1417.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map

1
Nutrients, EISSN 2072-6643, Published by MDPI AG
Back to TopTop