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Article

Exploring the Relationship between School Gardens, Food Literacy and Mental Well-Being in Youth Using Photovoice

1
Public Health Program—Child and Youth, Vancouver Coastal Health, Pacific Spirit Community Health Centre, 2110 W. 43rd Avenue, Vancouver, BC V6M 2E1, Canada
2
Department of Curriculum and Pedagogy, University of British Columbia, 2125 Main Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T1Z4, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(6), 1354; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11061354
Received: 18 April 2019 / Revised: 28 May 2019 / Accepted: 11 June 2019 / Published: 16 June 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diet and Mental Health)
The goal of the project was to gain an understanding of the relationships between secondary school youth experiences in school gardens and their mental well-being. Over the course of five months, sixteen youths participated in a photovoice research project in which they expressed their personal experiences about food and gardening through photography and writing. The aspects of secondary school youths’ life experiences affected by exposure to school gardens and their impact upon their well-being were identified. The youth explicitly associated relaxation with the themes of love and connectedness, growing food, garden as a place, cooking, and food choices. They were able to demonstrate and develop food literacy competency because of their engagement with the gardening and cooking activities. Youth clubs or groups were identified as a key enabler for connection with other youth and adults. Youth shared their food literacy experiences, observing that their engagement improved some aspect of their mental well-being. Through the photovoice process, the youth identified how their involvement in green spaces enabled connections with others, and highlighted aspects of personal health and personal growth, all of which contribute to their mental well-being. View Full-Text
Keywords: mental health; food literacy; photovoice mental health; food literacy; photovoice
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MDPI and ACS Style

Lam, V.; Romses, K.; Renwick, K. Exploring the Relationship between School Gardens, Food Literacy and Mental Well-Being in Youth Using Photovoice. Nutrients 2019, 11, 1354. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11061354

AMA Style

Lam V, Romses K, Renwick K. Exploring the Relationship between School Gardens, Food Literacy and Mental Well-Being in Youth Using Photovoice. Nutrients. 2019; 11(6):1354. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11061354

Chicago/Turabian Style

Lam, Vanessa, Kathy Romses, and Kerry Renwick. 2019. "Exploring the Relationship between School Gardens, Food Literacy and Mental Well-Being in Youth Using Photovoice" Nutrients 11, no. 6: 1354. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11061354

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