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Dietary Protein and Amino Acid Intake: Links to the Maintenance of Cognitive Health

1
Exercise Science Research Center, Department of Health, Human Performance and Recreation, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701, USA
2
Neurotrack Technologies, 399 Bradford St, Redwood City, CA 94063, USA
3
Clinical Excellence Research Center, Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(6), 1315; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11061315
Received: 20 May 2019 / Revised: 31 May 2019 / Accepted: 7 June 2019 / Published: 12 June 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Amino Acid Nutrition and Metabolism in Health and Disease)
With the rapid growth in the aging population, there has been a subsequent increase in the rates of Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias (ADRD). To combat these increases in ADRD, scientists and clinicians have begun to place an increased emphasis on preventative methods to ameliorate disease rates, with a primary focus area on dietary intake. Protein/amino acid intake is a burgeoning area of research as it relates to the prevention of ADRD, and consumption is directly related to a number of disease-related risk factors as such low-muscle mass, sleep, stress, depression, and anxiety. As a result, the role that protein/amino acid intake plays in affecting modifiable risk factors for cognitive decline has provided a robust area for scientific exploration; however, this research is still speculative and specific mechanisms have to be proven. The purpose of this review is to describe the current understanding of protein and amino acids and the preventative roles they play with regard to ADRD, while providing future recommendations for this body of research. Additionally, we will discuss the current recommendations for protein intake and how much protein older adults should consume in order to properly manage their long-term risk for cognitive decline. View Full-Text
Keywords: protein; amino acid; Alzheimer’s disease; dementia; cognition; cognitive decline; risk factors protein; amino acid; Alzheimer’s disease; dementia; cognition; cognitive decline; risk factors
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Glenn, J.M.; Madero, E.N.; Bott, N.T. Dietary Protein and Amino Acid Intake: Links to the Maintenance of Cognitive Health. Nutrients 2019, 11, 1315.

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