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Nutrient Intakes from Meals and Snacks Differ with Age in Middle-Aged and Older Americans

1
Division of Health Sciences, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, College of Medicine; Comprehensive Cancer Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
2
Abbott Nutrition, Nutrition Science, Columbus, OH 43219, USA
3
Division of Medical Dietetics, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
4
Department of Family Medicine, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(6), 1301; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11061301
Received: 9 May 2019 / Revised: 30 May 2019 / Accepted: 6 June 2019 / Published: 8 June 2019
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Abstract

The present study investigated the meal patterns across demographic characteristics in middle-aged and older US adults. Study participants were noninstitutionalized participants from the 2005–2016 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, an observational cross-sectional study. Data from 17,361 adults were categorized into 45–59 years (n = 7366), 60–70 years (n = 5348), and 71+ years (n = 4647) to compare demographics, nutrient intakes, and meal patterns. Dietary recalls were collected using the multiple-pass method. Data analyses were weighted to create a nationally representative sample. Two-thirds of adults reported consuming three meals on the day of intake. Lunch was the most often skipped meal across all age groups. A greater proportion of adults over 70 years reported consuming breakfast, while a smaller proportion reported consuming snacks. Significant differences were observed in total energy and nutrient intakes and proportion of the day’s intakes by meal. Grain, milk, and dairy food group intakes were highest at breakfast, while the protein food group intakes were highest at lunch and dinner. Age-related differences in meal consumption and composition provide valuable formative data to support targeted nutritional education and intervention opportunities to promote and encourage healthy food choices. View Full-Text
Keywords: breakfast; lunch; dinner; aging; NHANES; dietary intakes; dietary patterns; middle-aged adults; meal patterns; snack intakes breakfast; lunch; dinner; aging; NHANES; dietary intakes; dietary patterns; middle-aged adults; meal patterns; snack intakes
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Krok-Schoen, J.L.; Jonnalagadda, S.S.; Luo, M.; Kelly, O.J.; Taylor, C.A. Nutrient Intakes from Meals and Snacks Differ with Age in Middle-Aged and Older Americans. Nutrients 2019, 11, 1301.

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