Next Article in Journal
The Impact of Maternal Eating Disorders on Dietary Intake and Eating Patterns during Pregnancy: A Systematic Review
Previous Article in Journal
Mechanisms of Carotenoid Intestinal Absorption: Where Do We Stand?
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Nutrients 2019, 11(4), 839; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11040839

Poor Bifidobacterial Colonization Is Associated with Late Provision of Colostrum and Improved with Probiotic Supplementation in Low Birth Weight Infants

1
Department of Pediatrics, Shiga University of Medical Science, Seta Tsukinowa-cho, Otsu, Shiga 520-2192, Japan
2
Department of Pediatrics, National Hospital Organization Higashi-Ohmi General Medical Center, Gochi-cho, Higashiomi, Shiga 527-8505, Japan
3
Food Science & Technology Research Laboratories, Meiji Co., Ltd., Hachiouji, Tokyo 192-0919, Japan
4
Department of Agricultural and Life Sciences, Kyoto Prefectural University, Hangi-cho, Shimogamo, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8522, Japan
5
Kyoto Institute of Nutrition & Pathology, Furuikedani, Tachikawa, Ujitawara-cho, Kyoto 610-0231, Japan
6
Department of Community Perinatal Medicine, Shiga University of Medical Science, Seta Tsukinowa-cho, Otsu, Shiga 520-2192, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 22 February 2019 / Revised: 9 April 2019 / Accepted: 10 April 2019 / Published: 13 April 2019
  |  
PDF [780 KB, uploaded 15 April 2019]
  |  

Abstract

This study aimed to evaluate the association between bifidobacterial colonization in low birth weight infants and perinatal factors, including the timing of initial colostrum and the effect of probiotics on this colonization. In this non-randomized controlled trial, we enrolled 98 low-birth-weight infants from a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) in Japan. Infants were divided into three groups: group N (no intervention), group H (received non-live bifidobacteria), and group L (received live bifidobacteria). The number of bifidobacteria in the infants’ stools at 1 month of age was measured using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We divided infants into “rich bifidobacteria” (≥104.8 cells/g feces) and “poor bifidobacteria” (<104.8 cells/g feces) subgroups. The ratio of “rich bifidobacteria” infants was 20/31, 34/36, and 30/30 in groups N, H, and L, respectively. In group N, the “rich bifidobacteria” group received first colostrum significantly earlier than the “poor bifidobacteria” group (1 day vs. 4 days, P < 0.05). Compared with the N group, both groups H and L had a significantly high proportion of “rich bifidobacteria” infants (P < 0.05). Bifidobacterial colonization was poor in premature infants at 1 month compared with term infants, and the level of colonization was associated with the timing of initial provision of colostrum. Providing probiotics to premature infants can improve bifidobacterial colonization. View Full-Text
Keywords: premature infants; bifidobacteria; colostrum; probiotics premature infants; bifidobacteria; colostrum; probiotics
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Tanaka, K.; Nakamura, Y.; Terahara, M.; Yanagi, T.; Nakahara, S.; Furukawa, O.; Tsutsui, H.; Inoue, R.; Tsukahara, T.; Koshida, S. Poor Bifidobacterial Colonization Is Associated with Late Provision of Colostrum and Improved with Probiotic Supplementation in Low Birth Weight Infants. Nutrients 2019, 11, 839.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Nutrients EISSN 2072-6643 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top