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Nutrients 2019, 11(4), 821; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11040821

Green Tea Extracts Attenuate Brain Dysfunction in High-Fat-Diet-Fed SAMP8 Mice

1
Biological Science Research, Kao Corporation, Akabane, Ichikai-machi, Haga-gun, Tochigi 321-3497, Japan
2
Tea Science center, University of Shizuoka, Yada, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8526, Japan
3
Laboratory of Nutritional Biochemistry, Graduate School of Nutritional and Environmental Sciences, University of Shizuoka, Yada, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8526, Japan
4
Department of Health and Food Science, University of Human Arts and Science, Magome, Iwatsuki-ku, Saitama 339-0077, Japan
5
Department of Neurophysiology, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, Yada, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8526, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 4 March 2019 / Revised: 26 March 2019 / Accepted: 9 April 2019 / Published: 11 April 2019
PDF [1097 KB, uploaded 11 April 2019]

Abstract

Unhealthy diet promotes progression of metabolic disorders and brain dysfunction with aging. Green tea extracts (GTEs) have various beneficial effects and alleviate metabolic disorders. GTEs have neuroprotective effects in rodent models, but their effects against brain dysfunction in models of aging fed unhealthy diets are still unclear. Here, we showed that GTEs attenuate high-fat (HF) diet-induced brain dysfunction in senescence-accelerated mouse prone-8 (SAMP8), a murine model of senescence. SAMP8 mice were fed a control diet, HF diet, or HF diet with 0.5% GTEs (HFGT) for four months. The HF diet reduced memory retention and induced amyloid β142 accumulation, whereas GTEs attenuated these changes. In HF diet-fed mice, lipid oxidative stress, assessed by malondialdehyde levels, was increased. The levels of proteins that promote synaptic plasticity, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD95), were reduced. These alterations related to brain dysfunction were not observed in HFGT diet-fed mice. Overall, our data suggest that GTEs intake might attenuate brain dysfunction in HF diet-fed SAMP8 mice by protecting synaptic plasticity as well as via anti-oxidative effects. In conclusion, GTEs might ameliorate unhealthy diet-induced brain dysfunction that develops with aging.
Keywords: aging; green tea extracts; oxidative stress; senescence-accelerated mouse prone-8; synaptic plasticity aging; green tea extracts; oxidative stress; senescence-accelerated mouse prone-8; synaptic plasticity
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).

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Onishi, S.; Meguro, S.; Pervin, M.; Kitazawa, H.; Yoto, A.; Ishino, M.; Shimba, Y.; Mochizuki, Y.; Miura, S.; Tokimitsu, I.; Unno, K. Green Tea Extracts Attenuate Brain Dysfunction in High-Fat-Diet-Fed SAMP8 Mice. Nutrients 2019, 11, 821.

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