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Nutrients 2019, 11(4), 812; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11040812

Socioeconomic Disparities in Diet Vary According to Migration Status among Adolescents in Belgium

1
Research Center in Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Clinical Research, School of Public Health, Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB), 1040 Brussels, Belgium
2
Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Ghent University (UGent), 9000 Ghent, Belgium
3
Service d’Information Promotion Education Santé (SIPES), School of Public Health, Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB), 1040 Brussels, Belgium
4
Research Centre in Social Approaches to Health, School of Public Health, Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB), 1040 Brussels, Belgium
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 11 March 2019 / Revised: 3 April 2019 / Accepted: 6 April 2019 / Published: 10 April 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Behavior and Physical Activity in Children and Adolescents)
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Abstract

Little information concerning social disparities in adolescent dietary habits is currently available, especially regarding migration status. The aim of the present study was to estimate socioeconomic disparities in dietary habits of school adolescents from different migration backgrounds. In the 2014 cross-sectional “Health Behavior in School-Aged Children” survey in Belgium, food consumption was estimated using a self-administrated short food frequency questionnaire. In total, 19,172 school adolescents aged 10–19 years were included in analyses. Multilevel multiple binary and multinomial logistic regressions were performed, stratified by migration status (natives, 2nd- and 1st-generation immigrants). Overall, immigrants more frequently consumed both healthy and unhealthy foods. Indeed, 32.4% of 1st-generation immigrants, 26.5% of 2nd-generation immigrants, and 16.7% of natives consumed fish ≥two days a week. Compared to those having a high family affluence scale (FAS), adolescents with a low FAS were more likely to consume chips and fries ≥once a day (vs. <once a day: Natives aRRR = 1.39 (95%CI: 1.12–1.73); NS in immigrants). Immigrants at schools in Flanders were less likely than those in Brussels to consume sugar-sweetened beverages 2–6 days a week (vs. ≤once a week: Natives aRRR = 1.86 (95%CI: 1.32–2.62); 2nd-generation immigrants aRRR = 1.52 (1.11–2.09); NS in 1st-generation immigrants). The migration gradient observed here underlines a process of acculturation. Narrower socioeconomic disparities in immigrant dietary habits compared with natives suggest that such habits are primarily defined by culture of origin. Nutrition interventions should thus include cultural components of dietary habits. View Full-Text
Keywords: migration status; dietary habits; food frequency questionnaire; socioeconomic disparities; adolescents migration status; dietary habits; food frequency questionnaire; socioeconomic disparities; adolescents
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Rouche, M.; de Clercq, B.; Lebacq, T.; Dierckens, M.; Moreau, N.; Desbouys, L.; Godin, I.; Castetbon, K. Socioeconomic Disparities in Diet Vary According to Migration Status among Adolescents in Belgium. Nutrients 2019, 11, 812.

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