Next Article in Journal
Amount, Preparation and Type of Formula Consumed and Its Association with Weight Gain in Infants Participating in the WIC Program in Hawaii and Puerto Rico
Next Article in Special Issue
Challenging the Myth of Non-Response to the Ergogenic Effects of Caffeine Ingestion on Exercise Performance
Previous Article in Journal
Obesity Is Associated with Changes in Iron Nutrition Status and Its Homeostatic Regulation in Pregnancy
Previous Article in Special Issue
Consumers’ Perceptions of Coffee Health Benefits and Motives for Coffee Consumption and Purchasing
Open AccessDiscussion

Coffee Consumption and Risk of Colorectal Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Prospective Studies

1
Department of Health Sciences (DISSAL), University of Genoa, 16132 Genoa, Italy
2
Postgraduate School of Public Health, Department of Health Sciences (DISSAL), University of Genoa, 16132 Genoa, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(3), 694; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11030694
Received: 4 March 2019 / Revised: 18 March 2019 / Accepted: 19 March 2019 / Published: 24 March 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coffee and Caffeine Consumption for Human Health)
Coffee is a blend of compounds related to gastrointestinal physiology. Given its popularity and the epidemiology of colorectal cancer, the impact of this beverage on public health could be considerable. Our aim was to provide an updated synthesis of the relationship between coffee consumption and the risk of colorectal cancer. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of 26 prospective studies. Regarding colorectal cancer, no significant relationship was detected. Stratifying for ethnicity, a protective effect emerged in US subjects. Concerning colon cancer, coffee proved to exert a protective effect in men and women combined and in men alone. Stratifying for ethnicity, a significant protective effect was noted in European men only and in Asian women only. Concerning rectal cancer, no association was found. Decaffeinated coffee exhibited a protective effect against colorectal cancer in men and women combined. Studies were appraised for their quality by means of the Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale for Cohort studies. Only one study proved to be of low quality. Ethnicity could explain the heterogeneity of the studies. However, little is known about the relationship between the genetic make-up and the risk of colorectal cancer associated with coffee. Further research is warranted. View Full-Text
Keywords: coffee/caffeine; systematic review and meta-analysis; prospective studies; epidemiology; cancer prevention; colorectal cancer coffee/caffeine; systematic review and meta-analysis; prospective studies; epidemiology; cancer prevention; colorectal cancer
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Sartini, M.; Bragazzi, N.L.; Spagnolo, A.M.; Schinca, E.; Ottria, G.; Dupont, C.; Cristina, M.L. Coffee Consumption and Risk of Colorectal Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Prospective Studies. Nutrients 2019, 11, 694.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop