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Open AccessArticle

Validation of the Japanese Version of the Yale Food Addiction Scale 2.0 (J-YFAS 2.0)

1
Department of Public Health, Fujita Health University School of Medicine, 1-98 Dengakugakubo, Kutsukake-cho, Toyoake, Aichi 470-1192, Japan
2
Department of Psychology, University of Michigan, 2268 East Hall, 530 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
3
Faculty of Nursing, Fujita Health University School of Health Sciences, 1-98 Dengakugakubo, Kutsukake-cho, Toyoake, Aichi 470-1192, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(3), 687; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11030687
Received: 9 February 2019 / Revised: 13 March 2019 / Accepted: 19 March 2019 / Published: 22 March 2019
The Yale Food Addiction Scale 2.0 (YFAS 2.0) is used for assessing food addiction (FA). Our study aimed at validating its Japanese version (J-YFAS 2.0). The subjects included 731 undergraduate students. Confirmatory factor analysis indicated the root-mean-square error of approximation, comparative fit index, Tucker–Lewis index, and standardized root-mean-square residual were 0.065, 0.904, 0.880, and 0.048, respectively, for a one-factor structure model. Kuder–Richardson α was 0.78. Prevalence of the J-YFAS 2.0-diagnosed mild, moderate, and severe FA was 1.1%, 1.2%, and 1.0%, respectively. High uncontrolled eating and emotional eating scores of the 18-item Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire (TFEQ R-18) (p < 0.001), a high Kessler Psychological Distress Scale score (p < 0.001), frequent desire to overeat (p = 0.007), and frequent snacking (p = 0.003) were associated with the J-YFAS 2.0-diagnosed FA presence. The scores demonstrated significant correlations with the J-YFAS 2.0-diagnosed FA symptom count (p < 0.01). The highest attained body mass index was associated with the J-YFAS 2.0-diagnosed FA symptom count (p = 0.026). The TFEQ R-18 cognitive restraint score was associated with the J-YFAS 2.0-diagnosed FA presence (p < 0.05) and symptom count (p < 0.001), but not with the J-YFAS 2.0-diagnosed FA severity. Like the YFAS 2.0 in other languages, the J-YFAS 2.0 has a one-factor structure and adequate convergent validity and reliability. View Full-Text
Keywords: food addiction; Japan; validation; Yale Food Addiction Scale 2.0 food addiction; Japan; validation; Yale Food Addiction Scale 2.0
MDPI and ACS Style

Khine, M.T.; Ota, A.; Gearhardt, A.N.; Fujisawa, A.; Morita, M.; Minagawa, A.; Li, Y.; Naito, H.; Yatsuya, H. Validation of the Japanese Version of the Yale Food Addiction Scale 2.0 (J-YFAS 2.0). Nutrients 2019, 11, 687.

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