Next Article in Journal
Current Recommendations for Nutritional Management of Overweight and Obesity in Children and Adolescents: A Structured Framework
Next Article in Special Issue
Acute Effects of Nutritive and Non-Nutritive Sweeteners on Postprandial Blood Pressure
Previous Article in Journal
Post-Prandial Changes in Salivary Glucocorticoids: Effects of Dietary Cholesterol and Associations with Bile Acid Excretion
Previous Article in Special Issue
Sugar Responses of Human Enterochromaffin Cells Depend on Gut Region, Sex, and Body Mass
Open AccessArticle

Post-Stress Fructose and Glucose Ingestion Exhibit Dissociable Behavioral and Physiological Effects

1
Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
2
Department of Biological Sciences, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90007, USA
3
Department of Psychiatry & Biobehavioral Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
4
Staglin Center for Brain & Behavioral Health, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(2), 361; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11020361
Received: 7 January 2019 / Revised: 6 February 2019 / Accepted: 7 February 2019 / Published: 9 February 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fructose and Glucose for Human Health)
An acute traumatic event can lead to lifelong changes in stress susceptibility and result in psychiatric disease such as Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). We have previously shown that access to a concentrated glucose solution for 24 h beginning immediately after trauma decreased stress-related pathology in the learned helplessness model of PTSD and comorbid major depression. The current study sought to investigate the peripheral physiological effects of post-stress glucose consumption. We exposed 128 male Sprague-Dawley rats to inescapable and unpredictable 1-milliamp electric tail shocks or simple restraint in the learned helplessness procedure. Rats in each stress condition had access to a 40% glucose solution, 40% fructose solution, or water. Blood and liver tissue were extracted and processed for assay. We assessed corticosterone, corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG), glucose, and liver glycogen concentrations at various time points following stress. We found that rats given access to glucose following exposure to traumatic shock showed a transient rise in blood glucose and an increase in liver glycogen repletion compared to those that received water or fructose following exposure to electric shock. We also found that animals given glucose following shock exhibited reduced free corticosterone and increased CBG compared to their water-drinking counterparts. However, this difference was not apparent when glucose was compared to fructose. These data suggest that post-stress glucose prophylaxis is likely not working via modulation of the HPA axis, but rather may provide its benefit by mitigating the metabolic challenges of trauma exposure. View Full-Text
Keywords: glucose; fructose; liver glycogen; CBG; cortisol; learned helplessness; PTSD; rat glucose; fructose; liver glycogen; CBG; cortisol; learned helplessness; PTSD; rat
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Conoscenti, M.A.; Williams, N.M.; Turcotte, L.P.; Minor, T.R.; Fanselow, M.S. Post-Stress Fructose and Glucose Ingestion Exhibit Dissociable Behavioral and Physiological Effects. Nutrients 2019, 11, 361.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop