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Dietary Advanced Glycation End Products: Digestion, Metabolism and Modulation of Gut Microbial Ecology

Department of Diabetes, Central Clinical School, Monash University, Alfred Medical Research and Education Precinct, 3004 Melbourne, Australia
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Nutrients 2019, 11(2), 215; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11020215
Received: 7 December 2018 / Revised: 15 January 2019 / Accepted: 15 January 2019 / Published: 22 January 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Advanced Glycation End Products and Human Health)
The formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in foods is accelerated with heat treatment, particularly within foods that are cooked at high temperatures for long periods of time using dry heat. The modern processed diet is replete with AGEs, and excessive AGE consumption is thought to be associated with a number of negative health effects. Many dietary AGEs have high molecular weight and are not absorbed in the intestine, and instead pass through to the colon, where they are available for metabolism by the colonic bacteria. Recent studies have been conducted to explore the effects of AGEs on the composition of the gut microbiota as well as the production of beneficial microbial metabolites, in particular, short-chain fatty acids. However, there is conflicting evidence regarding the impact of dietary AGEs on gut microbiota reshaping, which may be due, in part, to the formation of alternate compounds during the thermal treatment of foods. This review summarises the current evidence regarding dietary sources of AGEs, their gastrointestinal absorption and role in gut microbiota reshaping, provides a brief overview of the health implications of dietary AGEs and highlights knowledge gaps and avenues for future study. View Full-Text
Keywords: advanced glycation end products; maillard reaction products; heat-treated diets; microbiota; short-chain fatty acids advanced glycation end products; maillard reaction products; heat-treated diets; microbiota; short-chain fatty acids
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MDPI and ACS Style

Snelson, M.; Coughlan, M.T. Dietary Advanced Glycation End Products: Digestion, Metabolism and Modulation of Gut Microbial Ecology. Nutrients 2019, 11, 215. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11020215

AMA Style

Snelson M, Coughlan MT. Dietary Advanced Glycation End Products: Digestion, Metabolism and Modulation of Gut Microbial Ecology. Nutrients. 2019; 11(2):215. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11020215

Chicago/Turabian Style

Snelson, Matthew; Coughlan, Melinda T. 2019. "Dietary Advanced Glycation End Products: Digestion, Metabolism and Modulation of Gut Microbial Ecology" Nutrients 11, no. 2: 215. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11020215

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