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The Role of Probiotics in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A New Insight into Therapeutic Strategies
Open AccessArticle

Effects of Some Food Components on Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Severity: Results from a Cross-Sectional Study

1
Laboratory of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, National Institute of Gastroenterology, “S. de Bellis” Research Hospital, Castellana Grotte (Ba), Via Turi 27, 70013 Castellana Grotte, Italy
2
Clinic Gastroenterologic Unit, National Institute of Gastroenterology, “S. de Bellis” Research Hospital, Castellana Grotte (Ba), Via Turi 27, 70013 Castellana Grotte, Italy
3
Laboratory of Nutritional Biochemistry, National Institute of Gastroenterology, “S. de Bellis” Research Hospital, Castellana Grotte (Ba), Via Turi 27, 70013 Castellana Grotte, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(11), 2744; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11112744
Received: 29 October 2019 / Accepted: 5 November 2019 / Published: 12 November 2019
Background: The high prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) observed in Western countries is due to the concurrent epidemics of overweight/obesity and associated metabolic complications, both recognized risk factors. A Western dietary pattern has been associated with weight gain and obesity, and more recently with NAFLD. Methods: This is a baseline cross-sectional analysis of 136 subjects (79 males) enrolled consecutively in the NUTRIATT (NUTRItion and Ac-TiviTy) study. Study subjects had moderate or severe NAFLD diagnosed by using Fibroscan-CAP. Food Frequency Questionnaire was used to obtain information about food intake. Statistical analysis included descriptive statistics and a multivariable logistic regression model. Results: The mean age was 49.58 (±10.18) with a mean BMI of 33.41 (±4.74). A significant inverse relationship was revealed between winter ice-cream intake and NAFLD severity (O.R. 0.65, 95% C.I. 0.95–0.99); chickpeas intake and NAFLD severity (O.R. 0.57, 95% C.I. 0.34–0.97), and not industrial aged-cheeses type (O.R. 0.85, 95% C.I. 0.74–0.98). A statistically significant positive association also emerged between rabbit meat (O.R. 1.23, 95% C.I. 1.01–1.49), industrial type aged cheeses (O.R. 1.17, 95% C.I. 1.01–1.35), milk-based desserts (no winter ice cream) (O.R. 1.11, 95% C.I. 1.01–1.21), fats (O.R. 1.12, 95% C.I. 1.01–1.25), and NAFLD severity. Conclusion: The fresh foods from non-intensive farming and high legume intake that characterize the Mediterranean diet would seem to be beneficial for patients with NAFLD. View Full-Text
Keywords: NAFLD severity; foods groups components; Food Frequency Questionnaire NAFLD severity; foods groups components; Food Frequency Questionnaire
MDPI and ACS Style

Mirizzi, A.; Franco, I.; Leone, C.M.; Bonfiglio, C.; Cozzolongo, R.; Notarnicola, M.; Giannuzzi, V.; Tutino, V.; De Nunzio, V.; Bruno, I.; Buongiorno, C.; Campanella, A.; Deflorio, V.; Pascale, A.; Procino, F.; Sorino, P.; Osella, A.R. Effects of Some Food Components on Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Severity: Results from a Cross-Sectional Study. Nutrients 2019, 11, 2744.

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