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Open AccessArticle

Impact of Vitamin D Deficit on the Rat Gut Microbiome

1
Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, Universidad de Granada, 18071 Granada, Spain
2
Ciber Enfermedades Cardiovasculares (CiberCV), 28029 Madrid, Spain
3
Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, School of Medicine, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid, Spain
4
Ciber Enfermedades Respiratorias (Ciberes), 28029 Madrid, Spain
5
Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Gregorio Marañón (IISGM), 28007 Madrid, Spain
6
Fundación Parque Científico de Madrid, 28049 Madrid, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Nutrients 2019, 11(11), 2564; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11112564
Received: 2 September 2019 / Revised: 14 October 2019 / Accepted: 16 October 2019 / Published: 24 October 2019
Inadequate immunologic, metabolic and cardiovascular homeostasis has been related to either an alteration of the gut microbiota or to vitamin D deficiency. We analyzed whether vitamin D deficiency alters rat gut microbiota. Male Wistar rats were fed a standard or a vitamin D-free diet for seven weeks. The microbiome composition was determined in fecal samples by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The vitamin D-free diet produced mild changes on α- diversity but no effect on β-diversity in the global microbiome. Markers of gut dysbiosis like Firmicutes-to-Bacteroidetes ratio or the short chain fatty acid producing bacterial genera were not significantly affected by vitamin D deficiency. Notably, there was an increase in the relative abundance of the Enterobacteriaceae, with significant rises in its associated genera Escherichia, Candidatus blochmannia and Enterobacter in vitamin D deficient rats. Prevotella and Actinomyces were also increased and Odoribacteraceae and its genus Butyricimonas were decreased in rats with vitamin D-free diet. In conclusion, vitamin D deficit does not induce gut dysbiosis but produces some specific changes in bacterial taxa, which may play a pathophysiological role in the immunologic dysregulation associated with this hypovitaminosis. View Full-Text
Keywords: microbiota; 16S rRNA sequencing; vitamin D deficit microbiota; 16S rRNA sequencing; vitamin D deficit
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MDPI and ACS Style

Robles-Vera, I.; Callejo, M.; Ramos, R.; Duarte, J.; Perez-Vizcaino, F. Impact of Vitamin D Deficit on the Rat Gut Microbiome. Nutrients 2019, 11, 2564. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11112564

AMA Style

Robles-Vera I, Callejo M, Ramos R, Duarte J, Perez-Vizcaino F. Impact of Vitamin D Deficit on the Rat Gut Microbiome. Nutrients. 2019; 11(11):2564. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11112564

Chicago/Turabian Style

Robles-Vera, Iñaki; Callejo, María; Ramos, Ricardo; Duarte, Juan; Perez-Vizcaino, Francisco. 2019. "Impact of Vitamin D Deficit on the Rat Gut Microbiome" Nutrients 11, no. 11: 2564. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11112564

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