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Open AccessArticle

Associations Between Dietary Protein Sources, Plasma BCAA and Short-Chain Acylcarnitine Levels in Adults

1
Institute of Nutrition and Functional Foods (INAF), Laval University, Quebec City, QC G1V 0A6, Canada
2
School of Nutrition, Laval University, Quebec City, QC G1V 0A6, Canada
3
Department of Kinesiology, Laval University, Quebec City, QC G1V 0A6, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(1), 173; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11010173
Received: 27 November 2018 / Revised: 11 January 2019 / Accepted: 11 January 2019 / Published: 15 January 2019
Elevated plasma branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) and C3 and C5 acylcarnitines (AC) levels observed in individuals with insulin resistance (IR) might be influenced by dietary protein intakes. This study explores the associations between dietary protein sources, plasma BCAA levels and C3 and C5 ACs in normal weight (NW) or overweight (OW) individuals with or without metabolic syndrome (MS). Data from 199 men and women aged 18–55 years with complete metabolite profile were analyzed. Associations between metabolic parameters, protein sources, plasma BCAA and AC levels were tested. OW/MS+ consumed significantly more animal protein (p = 0.0388) and had higher plasma BCAA levels (p < 0.0001) than OW/MS− or NW/MS− individuals. Plasma BCAA levels were not associated with BCAA intakes in the whole cohort, while there was a trend for an association between plasma BCAA levels and red meat or with animal protein in OW/MS+. These associations were of weak magnitude. In NW/MS− individuals, the protein sources associated with BCAA levels varied greatly with adjustment for confounders. Plasma C3 and C5 ACs were associated with plasma BCAA levels in the whole cohort (p < 0.0001) and in subgroups based on OW and MS status. These results suggest a modest association of meat or animal protein intakes and an association of C3 and C5 ACs with plasma BCAA levels, obesity and MS. View Full-Text
Keywords: branched-chain amino acids; acylcarnitines; dietary protein sources; meat; metabolic syndrome; metabolite profiling; diet branched-chain amino acids; acylcarnitines; dietary protein sources; meat; metabolic syndrome; metabolite profiling; diet
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Rousseau, M.; Guénard, F.; Garneau, V.; Allam-Ndoul, B.; Lemieux, S.; Pérusse, L.; Vohl, M.-C. Associations Between Dietary Protein Sources, Plasma BCAA and Short-Chain Acylcarnitine Levels in Adults. Nutrients 2019, 11, 173.

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